NEW PANDEMIC ADVISORY BOARD TAKES SHAPE

The Pandemic Security Initiative Introduces Scientific Advisory Board Founding Members, Leading Scientists Join Together to Prepare for the Next Global Pandemic

In Cambridge, MA; Lebanon, NH; and New York, NY – Celdara Medical announced today the launch of the Pandemic Security Initiative’s Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), a group of outstanding scientists and infectious disease experts. The SAB is an integral part of the initiative, and informs the initiative’s priorities, approaches, and opportunities for collaboration, all in the pursuit of pandemic preparedness.

Amidst a second wave of Covid-19 infections with still no definitive end in sight, the key structural issue in resolving pandemic scale threats continues to be the lack of commercial incentive for proactive development of diagnostics, prophylactics, and therapeutics, especially for diseases without incidence.

ARE SMALL ARTICLES THE FINANCIAL LIFELINE FOR CHARITIES?

 

We look at how the subtle growth of paid-for online Content, will be the revenue stream of choice for the charity and giving market. We focus on the SHEKINAH homeless charity in Plymouth and ask; is their model the way forward?

Charities are not backward when it comes to asking you and I for money. Every charity has it’s “please give me” column, it’s “terrible hardship” note, or “aspirational” look what we can do with your £5.00, and the list goes on.

They all sound so desperate and deserving in equal measure.

The problem is that in current times, the ordinary guy and family, have less disposable money to make the sort of contributions they used to do. And what is worse there is the hesitation of “what am I actually getting for my money. Feel-good factor is all very well but what about feeing your kids?

For many families, there are today’s choices, when for many, there is no comparison, and no option.

Except that maybe there is.

The growth of online Content has spawned a new payment process that allows Charities (and others), to charge nominal sums, in an instant, to read some of their published material. Instead of ticking the box to give a sum of money, the reader ticks the box to read something that stimulates him, that helps him understand better the charity involved – and in return, his small contribution, goes towards making a difference.

The SHEKINAH charity (shekinah.co.uk) uses the EXODOX (exodox.link) platform in Stockholm, to be the payment gateway. And it works like this.

SHEKINAH create a suitable article – which they publish either on their own site or on a third party News site, They install an EXODOX plugin – and create their unique payment account. They link their article to their payment account. And when you or I visit the Charity or News site, we click on the article, and pay usually £1.00 or so, to access the Content.

It is simple and immediate and you wonder why nobody had thought of this before. Maybe we were all waiting for “tap and go” and familiarity of card based transactions for pretty much not a lot.

But lots of “not a lot” mount up to “quite a lot”, thanks for asking.

The latest SHEKINAH article can be accessed at: https://www.thelibraries.co.uk/financial/society-does-not-depend-on-government-society-depends-on-society/

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TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTHCARE. WELCOME TO AHIMA20

OUR REPORT BELOW LOOKS  AT THE BEST OF USA HEALTH NEW SOLUTIONS.

The AHIMA Trade Association is the bible for healthtech specialists in the USA. Its is far removed from its HIMSS cousins, despite the fact that both are in the same Chicago metropolis. The difference being that AHIMA looks at how do you deliver the technology that will drive patient health in the future. And by that they mean, what is the programming, the system design, the architecture – the digital roadmap.

What AHIMA is not – is a vendor jamboree full of thousand of vendors. The current list of suitable vendors is probably less than 100. You could say it is quality over quantity but even that criticism is not correct. AHIMS is not interested in quantity per se. It is interested in “what is the best tech”. And that does not mean there is no commercial outreach. This is USA after all.

INNOVATION AND THE NHS. DOES IT REALLY WORK?

We look at the progress of Great Ormond Street hospital, London, and ask – was COVID the driver of their reach-out; and can other hospitals learn from this?

I’m sitting at my office desk and the good people at HIMSS media have sent me a long link so I can easily register. The details of my credentials are already known to them and already pre-filled when I click the link. I am on auto-pilot, I click “yes”. Many times. I am going to the HIMSS20 Conference in Helsinki, except that it is no longer in Helsinki. It is staged in a TV recording studio somewhere in west London.

Instead of trains and planes and hotels – I click on this virtual panorama and I could be walking around the Convention Center at Orange County Orlando – I feel sucked in, I pass by the names of the well known vendors, who have their Announcements, and Booths, and I almost miss it. Hidden on Day One, is the modest title:

“Lessons learnt from COVID-19: Supporting and protecting the front line”.

It is redolent of my own far distant days at Uni, the modesty of a non-engaging title that we all know hides far greater truths:

“Some new thoughts on Mozart’s Figaro”.

I pick up the phone, and get through the wait on reception at Great Ormond Street, and get connected. Catherine answers the phone. She is a nice lady.

“Do you want a Soundbite?” She laughs.

I laugh, in my turn. No. I want everything. I want to know how you do it.

What is obvious about this Presentation by Sarah Newcombe and Catherine Peters – is that – despite the turbulence of today’s times, and the recognition that everything has changed – in reality, nothing has changed. As Catherine says in her notes below – Great Ormond Street hospital started on this Innovation journey some four years ago. And HIMSS itself has always been the byword of digital tech reach-out. Speaking at HIMSS has always been a sign that you have made it.

Except that there are of course differences, Innovation itself does not necessarily mean tech. It may simply be a change in the way you approach things. There is no mention of technology in Steve Job’s mantra “think different”. And this is the point of convergence with Catherine’s thoughts; her standout advice is – if you want to get it right, then – “have a Plan; and do it now.”

You can argue that anyone can have “technology”. And anyone can have buzzwords. Just a few years ago it was “interoperability”. Today it is “digital”. I am not sure I know what “digital” actually means, but that does not matter. This discussion and presentation , is the journey that every hospital should be taking but that few have the courage or expertise to do, without a RoadMap.

The notes below, are the RoadMap. This is what Catherine says:

RB; “Innovation” is supposed to be the flavour of 2020.  If COVID had not happened, would you have gone down the innovation route that you discussed at HIMSS?

CP; GOSH has been on a digital maturation pathway for the last four years. The implementation of an enterprise wide electronic patient record (EPR) platform in April 2019 helped us leap forward on this journey. Having a fully digital and paperless health record meant that our staff were able to adapt to COVID rapidly and to continue to work remotely if needed.

The patient portal was included as a key element of our EPR from the outset, and we had actively encouraged patients and families to sign up prior to COVID. However, as the pandemic started, we could see the power of integrating video visits into the portal. Through concentrated power of will and the benefit of a highly functional team, we were able to work with our telehealth and EPR partners at a pace that was breath-taking and skilful. From a completely standing-start, we were able to deliver video meeting capability for 5000 staff and establish fully embedded video-visits capability within our EPR within eight days.

Our vision at GOSH has been to use technology, data and analytics to provide safer, better and kinder treatments and care. This has required strategy, focus and a plan. For us, true digital innovation needed to be a living, breathing entity underpinned by an empowered and enthusiastic workforce where continuous improvement is part of our culture. Innovation that is not nurtured or a fad does not thrive and become a reality.

We are very fortunate to already work within a highly functional and motivated team and for us, COVID has been an accelerating agent; COVID helped focus the minds of those around us to really move at a pace that is difficult to achieve in more normal times. In effect the COVID pandemic forced us to fast forward our plans

RB; Did you have to change your way of dealing with patients?

CP: Our patients are complex, and we have high numbers of face-to-face outpatient visits. This had to change, and we reversed the ratio of face-to-face and virtual appointments within a couple of weeks

The interactions between clinical staff and patients required both groups to adapt to new ways of working (environments, communication and medical assessment itself)
We also had to promote and actively sign up patients to the patient portal in order to schedule video visits. This in turn has opened up the possibilities of the patient portal to many patients and families. Messaging, lab results release and access to letters have been the most popular features of the portal. In turn this means we have improved engagement and communication with our patient groups.

This has fostered our patients being greater partners in their own help. Surely, the patient and their family are the most important members of the care team? We have developed bespoke functionality (“heads-up”) whereby patients are encouraged to ask their doctor or nurse any questions on their mind before each clinic visit. We feel this is a powerful tool to enhance the connection between patients and their clinical team. We are really happy to share any of our news ways of working and ultimately feel this type of capability would strengthen any outpatient consultation.

RB; The impression we had, was that although you have changed how you cope with things – actually you are still restricted by existing processes, i.e., protocols, policies, etc – that in themselves become a substitute for actual new things. How much did you have to throw the rule book out, so to say, or actually – you have never been restricted – there is an inherent flexible mindset?

CP; There are many ways in which our staff and patients have had to be flexible and change working patterns and environments. At the onset of the pandemic, team meetings, patient discussions, and operational meetings moved to telehealth and video conferencing platforms. Patient safety, clinical governance and safeguarding of course remain of paramount importance.

As a specialist children’s hospital, it is vital that our governance, while done in a timely manner, is done to the highest standards. Our approach to using technology and data successfully has been to incorporate it into the workflow of clinicians and we ensure it supports care delivery. This approach itself acts as a built-in parity check.

We also wanted to help the system and all paediatric patients across the country during the pandemic. Working closely with our colleagues in North Central London, we opened up GOSH to take patients with general paediatric conditions.

Our hospital is centred geographically between many other large hospitals. We were able to support patients and staff in these other locations by opening new ward environments and transferred general paediatric patients to our site. This in turn meant beds in other hospital units were available for adult COVID patients. We onboarded over 200 paediatric staff from other sites within weeks. The need for adaptability and flexibility has been required and achieved in so many areas of clinical care and we are really proud of our staff and patients.

Our greatest asset has been our staff and we are very fortunate to have full executive backing at Board Level in the Trust to leverage digital tools and capability to make a difference and enhance the care we delivery.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS FROM SCANDINAVIA

We are well used to Scandi businesses being ahead of the rast of EU and even globally in key verticals of healthcare, IT development and so forth. But what about general management?

We interview Steffen Conradsen, CEO of the Calm Water start-up in Denmark, and ask him – since his reticent beginnings and company launch just a year ago – well – how has it been?

It’s a stupid question. I am sitting in the empty bar area of the Copenhagen Towers. I am struggling with my mask. The day before, I had my first COVID Test as I sauntered through CPH Airport. It took less time to queue and take the test than I would normally spend in line at my local supermarket.

These are not normal times. Steffen is silver haired, smiling, and saunters towards me, he is comfortable in his own skin, and we find a seat at the adjacent coffee bar. Steffen has seen crises all before from his time as VP at Ericsson Denmark. If anybody knows how to launch a Consulting firm offering crisis-management in troubled times it is he.

Clear Water Consulting was not born out of any mid life desire to launch a new business. It was a simple choice of expediency. The downsizing of Ericsson in Denmark, left Steffen with choices – one of which was – where is the work/life balance now, and how best to offer his consulting skills.

And at a time over the last six months of continual crisis for so many large and small companies, in a variety of vertical disciplines, this has already turned out to be the best moment, rather than the worst.

Steffen leans forward and sips his cafe latte. We have moved on from the preliminary pleasantries. What he says is; “these COVID times are not going anywhere any time soon. If companies want to stay relevant in this new world and very different environment, then there has to be a process, a strict methodology – to cope with what will be unexpected situations, quite apart from the need to define what is a go to market plan for the next 12 to 60 months.

Clear Water has a pre-defined process that he has set out graphically, as well as list the four of five key points that govern his thinking. The strategy is explained in English. It is similar to Danish thinking, and their approach to life, the being very methodical and clear, and with no deviation. Reading the corporate blurb, there is little by way of philosophic al and conceptual discussion – apart from on the last page, where Steffen talks about being relevant in society.

Steffen continues; “Sure, things have been tough, but Clear Water is already profitable, and demand is high”. We are meeting mid-afternoon, and Steffen has already had three meetings around the Copenhagen suburbs .

I am expecting to see him any time soon passing through London – but was if to prove a point – Denmark goes into lockdown the day after I return to the UK.

Steffen Conradsen can be contacted at; +45 2812 7445

 

WHAT NEXT FOR UK EXPATS AND BUSINESSES?

Whilst the recent dispensing of several of its obligations under the Withdrawal Agreement by the UK Government has caused Uk business tremendous damage to its reputation and ability to get new business – a couple of key announcements published in the “L’Agefi” online newsletter in France, have crept under the radar unnoticed.

They should not have done so, as they are likely to have the more profound affect to the ordinary person and to pretty much every size of UK business.

It may come as no surprise that the giant AVIVA Insurance company in the UK has sold off its filial in Paris AVIVA France. These things come and go. What is interesting is the timing, In the same French publication just a few days before, there was a larger discussion about the exit of UK financial firms generally from the EU.

It seems that UK companies, for so long holding out for a continuation of things as they are – which benefits the UK – have decided enough is enough.They are coming home.

On a purely domestic level, this coincides with announcements elsewhere that UK expats, will not be able to continue their UK bank accounts, if they live in EU. It is however – Ok in reverse. If you happen to live in the UK, but have your bank account in Paris – well, that will seem to work fine. I know that because LCL have just sent me a new Bank Card, complete with a personalised photo on there front of the card, of some flowers in my garden. How nice.

My friend Victoria who lives in a flat in Paris, is very worried. The lack of financial passporting mentioned above, whilst inconvenient, is nowhere near as high an issue as the need to transfer qualifications – which threatens job viability – and quite apart from the shut down of ferry companies, who will no longer operate. And who can blame them? With some 7000 trucks planned to be parked up in fields in Kent, pending customs clearance – we are at the point of having customs-points next to Bromley South train station. More serious, is the lack of any physical card, that confirms residency and country rights. It is another Windrush in the making. In twenty years time, UK expats will not be able to physically prove, that they have UK rights, because the online IT Systems currently used, will be long gone. All of the above facilities that were free before, will now cost you and I money to get back to where we were, and with greater hassle.

As concerning as that is, UK businesses are in an even worse situation. We are now regularly seeing EU companies not wanting to enter into contractual terms with UK companies, because of concerns of contractual behaviour. And in order to efficiently handle financial simple tasks abroad, such as a simple clearance payment for good received or supplied – UK companies are being advised to set up their own EU office. Add to that the lack of mobility of long haul travel for the next six months or so, it is becoming increasingly difficult to see where UK companies are going to expand their business.

According to the newspapers in the UK, we are due for an increased unemployment phase, and there is a need for additional social security support. This is not the time for employees to lose jobs.

One would like to think that some sort of common sense will prevail, but our suspicion in the UK at least is that there are too many large corporate interests that are in direct opposition to the views and needs of the general public, who are both their employees and customers.

Perhaps we are too close to the action, here in the UK. Maybe it takes a French newspaper, to tell us what we should have seen from the beginning.

AHIMA launch new EU collaboration in AI and Telehealth.

The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and Frontiers Health, along with  the Healthware Group, recently agreed to a content collaboration that will serve health care professionals in both Europe and the United States.

It comes just prior to the launch of the annual AHIMA Conference, this time Virtual, in just 10 days time. (We will be talking with Michael Bittner, AHIMA Media Director, early next week, on  the key notes to be covered)  In meantime – What they say is this:

“Frontiers Health is recognized across Europe as a transformative organization with a long history of promoting innovation in health care,” said AHIMA CEO Wylecia Wiggs Harris, PhD, CAE. “Like AHIMA, they see the human behind health information and health policy, making our collaboration a natural fit.”

Frontiers Health, in cooperation with Healthware Group, is hosting two education sessions, focusing on telehealth and artificial intelligence in health care, at the AHIMA20 Virtual Conference taking place October 14-17. The sessions will feature speakers from companies like CarePredict, Intouch Group, Kaia Health, Vitality, and Wysa, as well as other global players from the digital health space.

In addition, both organizations will collaborate on sessions at the Frontiers Health Hybrid Conference this November. AHIMA’s international team will host several sessions within an overarching theme of “Data Driving the Future of Health.” AHIMA experts will discuss data consent, privacy, interoperability, patient access to their health information, and more.

“This collaboration serves AHIMA members and health care professionals in Europe, as both groups will have access to new content and resources with a global perspective,” Harris said. “It will also help AHIMA increase its international footprint and reach health care audiences around the world.”

“I am pleased to expand our collaboration with AHIMA and look forward to hosting two dedicated Frontiers Health sessions at the AHIMA20 Virtual Conference,” said Roberto Ascione, conference chairman of Frontiers Health and CEO & founder at Healthware Group. “Frontiers Health will share its extensive knowledge and first-hand experience in strategic spaces like telehealth and artificial intelligence. Through its cooperation with AHIMA, Frontiers Health will promote and contribute to the pivotal role of digital health innovation in the new normal.”

EUROVISION ON STEROIDS. WELCOME TO THE HIMSS 2020 EUROPEAN DIGITAL CONFERENCE.

With decision-makers from healthcare in some 98 Countries – including Russia, Israel etc – booked to attend; and around 172 Speakers, including 45+ keynote Speakers, including the WHO, the US ONC, and of course the key Partners from Finland (whose are supporting this Conference) – this five day event is as good as it gets in terms of bringing together where healthcare is going and needs to go.

Is it time we change the way we reach out to our clients? We have some better ways to boldly go…

It is a simple truth rarely understood, that if you are going to start sending out and relying on, written communication, to keep in touch with your customer-base; then at least make  it easy to read, and interesting.  That’s not too much to ask, is it?

The recent months of lockdown have seen a plethora, an avalanche of offers of Seminars, Webinars, online Discussion, in our inboxes every day, and all of these announcements have two things in common.  They are worthwhile and could well be helpful.  And they are absolutely boring and do not reach out to grab us and hold our attention.

Which is why the attached Image that accompanies this Article, is so key. It is a standout piece of graphic art commissioned by one of clients, The Futureshapers (www.thefutureshapers.com) – that our Team member, Ben, designed – with the aim of saying “look, it is time to go in a new direction, out of your comfort zone, and don’t be afraid to do that, if you want to stay successful in 2020… and of course beyond”.

There are two keys to this new process. First, your technical quality of delivery, be it a graphic (as above, say), or an Article, .. or a Video Interview, whatever… has to be spot on. It can seem “rough around the edges” but that in itself needs care to deliver that level of insouciance. And it has to be different.

That is because life itself is now different, for all of us. People are questioning what they did the things they did before, and coming up with new ways of working, and of keeping in touch.  Which means that – whatever is your size of company – you too have to recognise that, and act accordingly. Sometimes, you are too close to your own business, to see the broader or more varied options.

It is very rare that  in these pages we talk about our own business – but at ProfoMedia, we focus on original communication, and we can deliver this for you. Our numbers are on our Contact pages, do take a moment to call and have a chat.