How To Communicate with your Market

We take a moment to say why we started doing Video Interviews all those years ago…

It is one thing writing Editorial and Blog articles – and hoping that you as Readers will, – well, go read, if you will… But it is quite another maximising the time that we have in front of you as a reader, to ensure that you truly engage with us, and the points we are trying to make.

Everybody wants everyone to notice and read their material. But what we found all those years ago in Orlando USA – was that even six years ago when we started – there is just so much “content” out there, to read, that people no longer have the time to read.

We found that people prefer to engage, with other people.

In our Youtube video, we explain how this process works, why it is so important to focus on clear benefits, get to the point, – and why letting us write your material, but training you to deliver it, is natural and gets your customer attention.

Go visit; https://youtu.be/GKnFAiHHKaA.

Thanks for taking a few moments away, and for reading this small note.  Now back to work…..

Charity begins at home…

Good news, doesn’t sell newspapers. But there are times in life when we have just had it up to here with the incessant black and despairing Content that seems to populate our News channels.

At times like these, there are two options, reaching for the Gin bottle is one of them. The other, -which may well give you a more lasting satisfaction – is to bathe in some nice news, some nice human interest, the stories that do good for someone else.

Which is why we are publishing the request by Rory Clarke, Director at Rix, in Hull – to reach out to a local charity. Local charities rarely get the media coverage of their national cousins. But their needs are as acute. And you never know, you might be one of the people they help, in years to come. This is what Rory says;

“Hello, I’ve started fundraising for Child Dynamix . I’m running the Hull 10k to raise money for Child Dynamix who are a brilliant local charity providing care and support to young people growing up in some of the least affluent parts of Hull. For some people in these areas this support can be life changing Please sponsor me. Here is a link to my page http://www.justgiving.com/Rory-Clarke”

Best Regards
Rory

Rory Clarke
Director
J R Rix & Sons Ltd’

 

 

Brexit and your Business

We look at the latest numbers from the ONS and see what it means for your business.

The recent figures from the UK based Office for National Statistics (ONS) – says two things. They  are interesting because they show that; – first, whilst we have persuaded it would appear, less EU residents to come base their life in the UK – it is the EU newcomers and residents who have come and who do come, who are the most work hungry and already have jobs.  It is the Non-EU visitors, who are the most likely to come as a family, and then “look for work”.

The importance is that Brexit was based on a fear of immigration. but as the following example will show – we have succeeded only in turing away those residents who are actually contributing to our own UK economy – and in doing so, we have marginalised ourselves in the UK.

I saw this only this week, in an NHS Clinic, where I was fortunate to have surgery;  the majority of nurses, surgeons, Consultants, etc – were European. The quality of care was second to none.  But individually, they spoke to me with a sense of sadness – they loved the tolerance and relaxed and positive attitude of our society.

This resonates with meetings I had just last week – in international Conferences in Sweden, and in France – where separately, but by happenstance – senior delegates and vendors said to me:

“Look – we have been serious about entering the UK and building a new business there – but we no longer believe that YOU are serious”.

The impression we are giving as UK businesses, is that we do not value the people, and therefore we do not value the market – in Europe.

The question is – how to stop that?

The answer is one of face/face meetings.  We find that “showing seriousness” means getting on a plane. We have never lost a deal because we were, or were not, part of some political club.  But we have indeed lost deals, by not bothering to reach out to our international customers – who do seem more than willing to work with us.

 

Is the EHR in Terminal Decline?

We ask the question that nobody wants to admit..

When the slides failed during Mahad Huniche’s erudite address on the personalisation of healthcare at the recent HIMSS eHealth Europe Conference – he did what every speaker should do.  He ad-libbed, and carried on.  And in doing so – he said two things that were seismic in their importance.

The first – that we are entering an era of disruptive clinical IT – everybody “got”.  The second – that healthcare will now be driven by you and I as “consumers”, and as such, will be governed by eCommerce technology, rather than clinical technology – nobody got.

Whether we like it or not, the wearable technology that is ever more prevalent, will be the source of our own health data – and it will be transmitted, in real time, to wherever we want to send it – i.e., to places where they can monitor this and do something about it.  In short what this means is a reversal of the current necessity of a/having to travel to a place called a hospital;  and b/ having to use monolithic IT called “EHR Solutions” – to manage said information. It also means that the driver of future health improvements will be you and I, as we will insist that our healthcare givers can monitor us remotely; and that the hospital importance of people like CIOs etc, will fade into one of support. We just don’t need it any more.

This will do two things;  first, at a General Doctor level, fewer people will need to see their local GP – he will already know their info; this means that the GP (according to one that was discussing this with me on the plane recently) – can now spend as much time as they wish, sorting out the patients who are truly sick, as opposed to those who just “think”  they are.  It means less people coming into the A&E areas of hospitals (for the above same reason). And more important – less people requiring on demand beds in hospitals.  Our doctors will be able to tell us straightaway, remotely, if we need to be admitted as such.

The interesting point about all this – is that it;’s not like this technology is not available already,  Even places such as Turkey have their own regional connected patient record App, that will be the platform for the sort of enhanced personalisation we describe above – and this explains why Steve Leiber, CEO of HIMSS was already on a plane to Turkey even before the applause had died down from his opening Conference keynote speech.

The other interesting point, is that this consumer driven change – flies in the face of existing Hospital wisdom, who are continuing to invest in ever larger and all embracing “big patient record systems” – that will both be too cumbersome to give any actual clinical benefit, and too inflexible to cope with the personalisation that is not just required by the mobile wearable world we are all embracing, but by even now, some of the key modules that need to be stand alone in their own right – Theatre Management is a good example – if they are to cope with how individual communities want their healthcare.

What is worse – is that very few “communities”  are geared up at a bureaucratic level – to handle this. When we talked to several Kommuns in Scandinavia recently, their assessment was that it will be at least twelve months before they could look at a “Procurement” to put in place relevant services.

The result – is that not only will you and I start to define our own healthcare needs – but that we will go to places called Supermarkets, to obtain this.  The ICA supermarket  in Scandinavia is deep in expansion of its Apotek chain of walk in healthcare shops.  It can only be a matter of time before those services expand.

How so?

Because retail and supermarkets are the bedrock of eCommerce. And the very technology that drives the analysis of every purchase that you and I make in a store, is already being used to calculate the personalisation of Genomes and Genomics, as well as manage the health data wirelessly sent, all the time from yours and my Apple Watch.

Which brings me back to Mahad and his unfortunate slides. Sometimes you need to get to the horses mouth, the deeper vision. Who needs powerpoint anyway?

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New Advances in Personalised Remote Monitoring

Spry Health — a leader in health management technologies and remote patient monitoring announced today “Loop” — a first-of-its-kind combination of clinical-grade wearable and disease management platform. Loop enhances timely care to chronically ill patients, with individualized analytics to improve patient outcomes, reduce hospitalization; and decrease spending by healthcare organizations.

Following in the footsteps of similar but complementary devices from Sahlgrenska Science Park, Sweden,   the heart of Spry Health’s mission is empowering better care – the right care at the right time – for patients who are coping with chronic conditions. Spry Health, incubated at the highly-selective Stanford-affiliated accelerator StartX, began in 2013 in the minds of founders Pierre-Jean “PJ” Cobut and Elad Ferber while Stanford business school students. In 2013, Business Insider named them among 17 Stanford business school graduates who will change the world.

Both founders have watched family members struggle with navigating the healthcare system with chronic illnesses: they came together with a mission to bring proactive care to chronically ill patients. “The body is a system in constant change — but nobody is monitoring the micro-changes in patients with chronic conditions”, says Cobut, “We are building a solution to bridge gaps in traditional chronic care management.”

By design Spry Health developed Loop to be a catalyst for both better care and lower costs.

“In a given year, over 28 million hospitalizations are attributed to chronically ill patients, resulting in an average bill of $37,300 per stay with some patients winding up in the hospital three or more times per year,” says Ferber. Empowering chronically ill patients is what drives the company’s dedicated team of experts in advanced health informatics, biological signals analysis, and medical research.

The Loop wearable continuously and noninvasively collects vital signs to assess the patient’s baseline,  and monitor how their condition evolves. Loop’s analytics platform pinpoints subtle physiological changes and delivers relevant, actionable insights to healthcare organizations before new symptoms are noticeable to the patient.

Healthcare organizations can then guide their most vulnerable members to the right care at the right time. The combination of an easy-to-use wearable with individualized analytics increases peace of mind and compliance for patients, improves their outcomes, and prevents costly hospitalizations.

Spry Health conducted “one of the more comprehensive pre-market evaluations of a digital medical device ever published”, said Steve Steinhubl, MD, at Scripps Translational Science Institute. The evaluation had over 250 participants to prove the clinical equivalence of Loop against standards of care for blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiration, and CO2 monitoring.

Spry Health has submitted with the FDA and is seeking clearance for Loop by early 2018.

How Advanced is UK Healthcare?

We take a look at the upcoming eHealth Europe HIMSS Conference in Malta, and ask; where does the UK figure?

According to  the Independent Newspaper recently,  UK Healthcare provision, is on a par with some of the “lesser” countries in Europe.  It is now no better than places  such as; Poland, Turkey, etc.

This is  both a kick in the teeth to the good people of Poland and Turkey, and it  is also misleading. It is not the case that the UK is falling downwards.  It’s just that other places are doing better. Turkey in particular, ever since Mehmet Atasever, former VP Health Ministry in Ankara,  met me at a HIMSS Conference in Brussels, and handed me his 5 year Plan – has been progressive and focussed on new solutions, custom built, but (despite recent politics) – open to European links. Key areas of advance are the provision of Insurance based treatments, to help finance the general population access to five-star hospital Treatment, etc.

And it is not the case that the NHS is completely underfunded. We have shown in earlier Posts, that Hospitals can usually find the money when needed. The question may be that surprising answer, which is;  maybe Hospitals don’t actually “want”  to find the answer?

To get to that conclusion, you need to compare UK Health provision, with that in Scandinavia.  Because of the growth of Medical Science Parks, in Sahlgrenska Gothenburg; and Pharma, in Lund and Gothenburg – there is a stimulated market in acceptance of new technologies, to help drive better care, which is now regarded as the top area in Europe (including the UK).  This explains why some 20% of Visitors to eHealth Europe in a few weeks, are from Scandinavia – but only 5% are from the UK.

The UK has its own Health Conference, the week before, in London.  Our question is therefore  – why so? It surely has to make more sense to bring everyone together under one common roof?  As we have seen above,  going our own way is not helping us in terms of keeping up with better services.

Nevertheless, things might be changing. Although we ourselves will be Moderating the Nordics session of eHealth Europe, on “bridging data and genomics” – the Genomics England organisation has just appointed a new Commercial Director.

There are key and specific areas of clinical provision, where the UK is expert. What is now needed is to bring this acceptance of new processes – into other areas, particularly IT.

 

 

How Safe is the IoT?

We look at the recent situation at Abbott, and get a comment from new kids on the block, Tridentify AB (www.tridentify.se) –  Sweden.

At a time when Abbott Laboratories have been the subject of a stinging criticism from the US FDA, for  failing to properly investigate and resolve risks related to its implanted heart devices, including cybersecurity threats and a battery malfunction linked to two patient deaths – it’s important to take a measured view, and ask; are all devices that contain a battery, and can send info  – likely to run into these same problems.

Not according to new Tracer developers,  Tridentify. Based in Stockholm and Gothenburg, their CIO Leif Sandvik.  It all depends on whether you have actual patient data. Simple tracking of info and pure functionality, should not be an issue. This is what he says and how Tridentify solve these aspects:

“It is correct that we use AES-128 for all communication in QTA Tracer System, but the most important is that we do not use any patient data in the system for the moment. This mean that we actually do “not have any” data to protect even if we do it.😬

If a battery should fail, the tracer will reset and the red LED will flash. If the battery is drained no LED will flash and according to the manual the product should be handled as expired.”

But Johan Snis,  former Abbott Marketing Manager and new Commercial Director at Tridentify – goes further:he says there will always be some element of risk – but this is manageable;

“I would say that secure data is an important topic when entering IoT or IoMT as med tech has their own abbrevation.
Hospitals was one of the last “industries” to internetify themselfes and still they are a bit behind in knowledge and technology, including security. But patientdata is now, in most countries, in digital format on databases accesible from interhospital networks. So if healthcare already has accepted that evolution they cannot void themselfs against IoT. And they shouldn’t, since this is the most prominent way to personalize healthcare and keeping patient at home or specialist clinichans on remote locations.

However, data security is important. All data transfered to and from QTA is done using AES-128, Advanced Encryption Standard. The encryption uses a 128 bit key and it gives 3,4×10^18 possible key combinations.
If we would use the fastest supercomputer in the world it would take it approx 1 billion billion years to crack the encryption. The universe is 13.75 billion years old as we speak.
If we assumes that every person on the earth has 10 computer each and all of them would be used to crack the encryption it would take 77,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 years.

So data transfer can be secure. The above argument doesn’t say that it cannot be broken but that it will be tough. On the other hand it is possible to break into a hospital, it is possible to disguise as a doctor and give poison to a patient. Paper journals are possible to steal and forge…and so on.

For me the discussion has to be open minded. Yes it is very important to have secure future system! On the otherhand, the system used today are not foolproof or “pentagon” secure.”