New look at Digitalisation in healthcare

The recent Seminar announcement from EHTEL is worth visiting – we look at the specifics… what they say is this:

Digitisation in health opens up tremendous perspectives for new data-driven services. Our webinar to debate how individual health data combined with data collected in health and social care will provide the fuel for innovation in the future.

The implicit question is: What is Europe’s role in data economy and could maintaining trust be the biggest opportunity for Europe?

Jointly with Sitra, EHTEL is pleased to invite you to a webinar around the IHAN approach for trustfully personalised health services. Sitra’s IHAN® project aims to build the foundation for personalised wellbeing and healthcare services. It is a collaboration effort for European organisations. Evidently such an effort can be of interest for eHealth Competence centres, and all projects and initiatives involved in managing digital health data, also with a view for Artifical Intelligence based services.

Having been inspired by an EHTEL network meeting, we will inform on what IHAN is all about. What are building blocks for the IHAN rulebook like architecture, interoperability and trustful use? What are the core technical components including identity wallet, consent management and logging. How can these components be built according to IHAN requirements?

As an example, My Travel Health – Tokyo 2020 will be presented: The pilot project aims to benefit all stakeholders – travellers get medical attention faster and more precisely; the provider’s health data is securely exchanged with traveller’s consent; and medical teams can quickly get trusted patient information in their own language.

EHTEL moreover understands the webinar as an important milestone to define an AI-friendly environment in health and social care. This idea will be highlighted in more detail at the EHTEL 20th Anniversary & Symposium early December in Barcelona.

The Seminar is Monday 16th sept, at 15.00 CET; or 14.00 UK time. Join via: Skype for Business (connecting details will be shared upon registration)The Seminar is Monday 16th sept, at 15.00 CET; or 14.00 UK time.

Full Agenda is here for download,

Some Healthcare Updates…

Two of the leading independent voices in European and USA healthcare have published today and in past few days, some important announcements that need sharing.

The first – from the COCIR trade association in Brussels, concerns standardisation of medical device standards; this is really key, because without this, countries cannot refer or regulate new innovations and vendors cannot offer this internationally; what they say today is:

Brussels, 25 July 2019 – In response to the European Commission’s publication of the draft standardization request for the MDR and IVDR, COCIR has developed detailed feedback and recommendations for improvement of the document. We have always underlined the importance of having harmonised standards available and cited in the Official Journal under the new Regulations. Unfortunately, the proposed draft standardisation request still includes several elements that prevent flexible harmonisation and timely reference of standards in the Official Journal. COCIR recommends to the European Standardisation Organisations to reject this request if it is adopted in the currently proposed form. COCIR is more than ready to engage in further discussions with the European Commission and member states on this topic. We specifically call upon the next Commissioner for the Internal Market to find pragmatic solutions to the current deadlockBack

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And in the USA, the AHIMA organisation based in Chicago, has two days ago announced the aim of country-wide use of a standard Patient ID; you wonder what they did before….

This is a different and expansive take on their usual technology coding and practical approach., as they move nearer to compete with HIMSS.

We will get a view shortly from our colleague Christina Roosen, who knows both organisations well – to see where this is heading.

Clever People. Important Discussions.

We engage with the very clever people on both sides of the table at the Millenium Hotel London and ask – why do I not understand this?.


The answer is, of course – that I am not meant to understand it. The whole point of working with people who talk in languages and have skillsets that I do not understand – is that on my side – I have competences that are completely unknown and confusing, for them too.

Business depends on the communication of competences across the divide, and this is why every year as ritual, the IQPC Conference on AI, and on Intelligent Automation – has become a must see event, de rigeur. At whatever level of vertical corporate you are – Data and its automated future, are the way things will go for your industry and you need to be ready.

And it’s not that I am stupid. Mark Whitehorn’s discussion on where automated data can take us, was powerful but as a mere marketeer, was deliberately over my head.

But not over everybody’s head; the questions from the floor were equally intellectual and important, and there was a meeting of minds among a whole section of delegates and the speaker of this initial presentation.

As if recognising this small imbalance – Alasdair Anderson stepped up into the Panel and gave the more business focussed view. And this is the secret so to say, of the IQPC Conference; the balance of many views, and the opportunity to meet with one’s peers, from whatever provenance.

If there were two fundamental questions raised and answered, they were; what does it take to implement this stuff? It is ok having the technology, but here has to be a willingness and an understanding to do so.

As one delegate said; “what does it take in terms of incentive, to open the doors of the people who implement and deliver the benefit of, AI?” And from another colleague – a simple question: “Will this technology make the boat go faster?”

As always, the benefit of the IQPC Conference is as much in its casual networking between episodes.

I have to dash for an evening engagement but by mid afternoon delegates are already in deep discussion. There will be more hopeful of the same, next year.


IQPC schedule of similar conferences can be viewed at; http://www.iqpc.co.uk

Hannah Lou Reid

Music as You Go.

I’m walking though the shopping area of Plymouth in South West Uk and I am in a hurry. I walk past the most amazing singer and her jazz trio supporting her – and then I stop.

Hannah Lou Reid is still a teenager, fresh from City College, and has the most engaging and clear jazz/soul voice I have heard in a long time. It is note perfect, brilliant clear range – redolent of Natalie Williams at Ronnie Scotts, that forces you to stop and listen. The melodic grasp is punctuated by the strong rhythmic guitar, very clever chords, that take the music to a higher dimension. In my twenty seconds of listening, this is no three-chord ensemble.

If you are on vacation down in the South West of Uk, go online, see if you can catch Hannah in the Sreet or at one of her next performances. Worth a trip.

A Star for Our Times

We interview Rachel Oyawale, the new face at English National Opera, to see first hand how this mesmerising and inspirational young lady has captured the attention of the opera musical world in London and beyond

I am sitting downstairs in their bar area at ENO on a warm Saturday afternoon and Rachel Oyawale suddenly arrives.

She is fresh, bright, smiling, just like her public photos but more relaxed, totally open. She is eager to talk, to communicate the passion that so evidently drives her but not in that egotistical way of so many. There is no ego here. This is a young lady who has found her dream, by chance – but it is a dream nonetheless that has become reality. Rachel Oyawale is the embodiment of the ENO dream as much as her own; the reaching out and giving the social benefit of opera, to the many young people who are unaware of its existence.

We climb the carpeted stairs and finally reach the top floor where there is some peace away from the waiting audience for a show below – and then we talk.

We talk about everything. Opera for the many; ENO and young people; the difficulty for young people to find an entry point; black people in a white world, even now; thank God for ENO Baylis; Porgy and Bess; La Boheme – where it first started – and so on. There is no stopping. Rachel is supremely eloquent, about to take up a degree offer at Cambridge, but this is no intellectual conversation per se. This is the use of words, the search for the right way to express Rachel’s passion for what she knows she loves.

My colleague Amelia Grace, the young 15 year old blogger from Hull, sits opposite – two young women on a similar trajectory, just a few years apart.

And so we talk about background. From a single parent family, living the normal life of so many in South East London, this is not the start you would expect to find the embryo of an opera singer. And it happens by accident. The coincidental remark by school teachers at 14yrs old – “hey you sing rather well!” – to the visit, instigated by Rachel’s mum – to see La Boheme, at Covent Garden – and the light-bulb moment where it all comes together; not just the fusion of art and life in music – but the moment where you know – you just know – that this is what you want to do.

And the coincidental, at that moment, availability of the last place at ENO Baylis for their Young Person entry programme – the mentoring by her older peers, and the sense of “family” that ENO is so good at, that have all slotted into place – and that have left a mark that is the foundation of where Rachel sees her opera process going.

I first saw Rachel by chance as well – at the recent ENO Gala Performance where she picked up The Lilian Baylis Award for Outstanding Potential. And yet this does not seem accidental.

I ask Rachel is there some sort of future structured plan; she is not sure, but I am sure there has to be; she says “I have made so many friends at ENO that I do hope I can continue to mix my degree course with my opera singing”.

In so many ways, Rachel is a woman for our times – at not even twenty years old, but with a strong sense of where women in general can achieve.

We leave the opera house and find the lounge bar in the St Martins Hotel just next door. We sip a Gin Tonic appropriately called a “Don Giovanni”.

“Yep, that touches the spot”, she says.

A woman for our times indeed.

A full version of the Rachel Oyawale Interview is soon online at; http://www.profomedia.uk

Care On Our Own Terms

As Kaveh Safavi of Accenture continues his annual look at our global healthcare, we look at the changes that healthcare providers have to face up to, and ask – what are they afraid of?

Fear manifests itself in a number of ways. The traditional route in surgeries and hospitals, is to stick to the status quo. Nobody gets fired for doing what they always did. or to put it more directly – burying one’s head in the sand. As said above, nobody gets fired for being myopic.

I “get” that fear of the unknown, is relevant. But fear of what we already have, and which the public are increasingly demanding – should be a wake up call. The question is, – is fear of progress created by simple lack of understanding.

People that know about these things in UK NHS Management, tell me that “the NHS will be fully digitalised within the next 20 years”. This is both 20 years too late, and also misunderstands what we mean by digitalisation, and what you and I increasingly demand from our healthcare providers.

For a start, just about all of us in possession of our Apple Watch, our Smart mobile – are already capable of managing our own health and scary symptoms, in real time, online, thanks very much, from the comfort of our armchair. When we call our Doctor, phone our hospital – we already have the data, personally and as consumers, of our own health situation. And moving on – as patients, we do not need the large corporate AI to automate the personal data that our hospital does not yet have. What we need, is the immediate link between our personal way of life, and people who know how to treat us at a place called a hospital, when we get sick.

So when Kaveh Safavi, Health spokesman at Accenture – says in his recent Seminar at HIMSS Europe – that patients are now increasingly moving away from traditional routes to health provision – he is sounding a warning bell. And he has the global numbers to prove it.

What he says is, – is that trad primary care is in decline. In the years 2013-2017, use of virtual access to healthcare, rose in the USA by some 200%. Already, in the UK, some 33% of the population go online to access our healthcare provider, at least once per year. In Finland, some 67% of the population would gladly get their healthcare access online – if only the infrastructure was there to do so.

But interestingly, – what Kaveh eloquently also says is – this is no cause for alarm. It is simply that, as patients and that dreaded word “consumers”, we are making lifestyle choices. It is not a case of “either/or”. Or “A or B”. It is a multiple choice of A-B-C-D-E, and these choices are based on what is the best availability of the healthcare that we need, that fits our lifestyle. So, if we prefer to drop in to a walk in clinic at our train station en route to the office – so be it,- as long as they have access to our data. Some regions are already recognising this Scénario. In Spain, some 33% of the population go online for virtual healthcare, and a further 83% prefer a retail environment to get primary care access.

This means two things; first – if we believe that prevention is better than cure, then investment and recognition needs to go into the provision of consumer based services. As said above, the growth of smart phone solutions means we are all doctors now. And that second, there is nothing to fear from a mix of healthcare provision at our local hospital. You could argue that the relevance for a hospital will increasingly be the provision of every level of walk in service, in the same way that supermarkets in Sweden offer walk in healthcare.

I’m sure Steve Jobs did not envisage the tangential App development in our personal lives, when Apple launched the iPhone all those years ago. But we live in a real world. And if you are reading this article on your ipad as you travel to work – well, that wasn’t too scary now, was it?

Managing Energy has never been more important.

We look at the upcoming Future of Utilities: Smart Metering Update 2019 conference on Smart Metering of Energy and ask – why has it taken so long?

In brief – this topic has been discussed and received focus – for the past five years even to our knowledge. But in those earlier halcyon days, small interruptions such as hacking and global warming were but twinkles in our eyes. Nowadays of course – things have changed. As my colleague at a Cyber Security company in Israel tells me – “there are two types of smart meter; those that have been hacked and nobody knows it; and those that are hacked and everybody knows it”. And for sure everybody knows about global warming.

So the upcoming Conference from Marketforcelive, in central London this June, is timely. This is the latest and important opportunity for leaders in the Energy space, to sit down and say – how are we controlling access to the flow of energy, both remotely and at source. Saving energy has been defined as the secret sauce of modern energy management, We are not as naive as before.

Whereas before, delegates that subscribed tended to come from the pure data and tech environments and talked in a language that you or I could not understand – nowadays, this Conference will attract the commercial leaders and all those on the peripherals. Energy control is essential big business in a world where such is the reach of media, we are all experts now.

With an impressive Speaker List – we expect “Future of Utilities: Smart Metering Update 2019”,to become a Forum for exchange of ideas that are proven and that work, a significant development from other Conferences in the past that were merely talking shops.

The Conference takes place on the 18th June; go visit it at; http://bit.ly/2wGAiqZ. our longer report will follow shortly after.