NEW LAWYERS. TRANSFORMATION OF A PROFESSION

The subtle movement and shift of emphasis from today’s lawyers into Business Partners and strategic advisers – has changed the view that we have of them – and them of us. The question is; is this a difficult sell?

Nora Teuwsen is looking at me across the screen. She is dressed in Swiss minimalist chic, dark grey modern clothes, long auburn hair. As former General Counsel for Swiss Railways, and surrounded by the financial areas of Zurich, she is well placed to make a perceptive judgement.

“It used to be”, she says. “But now, Corporates are waking up to the fact that their in-house Lawyer is also a modern facilitator”.

Like so many young lawyers starting out, Nora had little clue of what a legal profession entailed. Her motivation had been more a belief in justice, integrity, that she still regards as valuable of all skills to have. What she was not prepared for in those early days – was the lack of client contact, and to work out and discover an understanding, that her preferred role was one of explanation, to explain the “why” things need to be so.

She is calm but animated in her delivery, you can see the entrepreneurial spirit that is driving her responsibility to take her client on a journey. The legal background has no longer become the prime reason for being retained, it is the structure of thought that can open other commercial discussions.

It is no surprise that after 15 years with Swiss Railways, it was obvious that the next step was to create a vehicle that could embrace all of these attributes and competences, into one, that could be offered as a package so to say.

What she says is; “companies are underestimating the value of their legal department”, and in many ways that department needs to be courageous in pushing for creative and pragmatic solutions which are taking into account the company’s strategy and focussing on longterm value.

Nora continues: “The role of the legal department is expanding. Areas of sustainability, social responsibility, are becoming the go to areas of importance for corporates of all sizes, and the legal department can assist in handling that interest.”

It is also a focus on use of Data. Surprisingly, Nora is not convinced by use cases in Artificial Intelligence in the legal industry. There is a great transformation going on, but so far, results are limited. So far, it has not come up on her radar as a priority.

The “BeyondLegal” Boutique Firm, Nora’s brainchild – from a single Zurich base – is already international clients. “What we are trying to do, is build a network of like-minded legal professionals. We live in an international world”.

I turn off my screen and take a moment of reflection. In a technology driven marketplace, human values are still the bedrock of our corporate growth, which we always had but somehow had been forgotten. Some things remain the same.

IS DIGITALISATION THE SUICIDE NOTE OF BUSINESS?

We look at SEO and the epidemic of digital solutions in Biz Dev, and ask; are we missing the point here?

I have a colleague, who is Head of Procurement for some large areas of Scandinavia. And what he says is this; “Richard” – he says – “ I have deliberately stopped answering any emails, or any calls, from anybody I do not recognise. If you want me to talk to any of your people, just let me know in advance and I will put their number in my personal contacts.”

In the same way that the freedom of the internet has given us multiple information choices that should have given us a broader outlook – and the reverse has been true – that we only focus on those news feeds that say the things we already believe, – and made worse by algorithms that proactively feed us those restrictive views. So – the same is with SEO and all things digital.

We can now reach out to anybody on this planet. But so can everybody else. Which means that the people that we need and want to talk to – for our business growth, our customer service, etc – have long since made the decision not to be available, at all.

What that means is that, far from being simple to grow a business by finding a person who we do not know, and just giving them a call, has now become more than four times as long and four times as expensive, and now involves, pre-sales people, post-sales people, all manner of IT support and analysis, to do what used to be the straightforward and simple task of just phoning a friend of a friend.

But what is worse, is that this has given acceptance and justification, to being proactive in not making human contact possible at all. Woe betide any receptionist who passes on yours or mine contact details!

This means that both sides are the losers. Vendors of great solutions give up, because they cannot support the increasing drain open their marketing spend. And Corporates or our Public Services continue with their outdated practices because nobody has been able to show them otherwise.

If COVID restrictions have taught us anything, it is that human nature needs human involvement, and yet we seem to be travelling at warp speed in the opposite direction. It is as if we are scared about the whole process of actually talking together in a business environment, or being”sold to”. How terrible.

In our own business here at Profomedia, we research a lot and are continually building personal relationships. Whenever we want to find out something, we reach out and phone someone we already know, – who then introduces us to someone who we don’t.

There. It wasn’t so difficult, was it.

INNOVATION AND THE COMMON MAN! YES, WE CAN NOW TALK FACE/FACE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE DELIVERY DIGITAL INNOVATION.

We give a long overdue and welcome to the upcoming HETT Show, taking place on 28-29 September, at the Excel London, as an essential platform for our UK digital healthcare providers. 

The HETT Show (www.hettshow.co.uk) – as the Uk’s leading health event, opens its doors in a couple of months. The HETT Show is one of the first serious events to greet us all, in person, and it is like when you have to hand your courtesy car back at the end of the day when your usual vehicle is being serviced. “No, I don’t want to go back to my old car, thanks! I prefer the new shiny one you lent me instead.” 

Because – let’s face it – face-to-face events are the perfect place to gain insights and network. We miss the being there. And now we are back. Yes, we can indeed keep the courtesy car with the new number plates, after all. We can now justifiably drive off, and talk about Innovation.

HETT believes that innovation is the sauce that will empower the workforce in our hospitals and surgeries. The Show promises to herald a “new era of transformation”. And indeed it may well do so, for two surprising reasons. First, we are indeed, so fed up with the isolation of the past 15 months, it was fun in the beginning, true – but not now. And second, the success of any Innovation roll out, depends on precisely this, the motivation of the individual, to get up and actually “do something”.  

It is a realisation that if Innovation is to deliver for the common man, the patient, then this is not a technology process, but a human experience process, that involves all of us, at each individual level in the workplace. And for that single reason, HETT has a unique advantage, it is first, in bringing us all together. 

Over the past year and more, there have been significant differences in quality of care and even interest in delivering quality care, geographically throughout the UK. We see HETTshow (www.hettshow.co.uk) as an opportunity to re-examine where we are, and to meet people who can help this journey. 

We will be publishing a Series of Case Studies of those Hospitals and Surgeries who have made Innovation work for them in the past year, despite all the odds. At a time when queues and delays for procedures are at an all-time high, this is a clear moment to get back on track.

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DIGITALISATION; HERE’S AN IDEA YOU MIGHT LIKE!

Does success in “becoming digital in our workplace” mean we are all techies?”  We interview Katie Trott, Chief Nursing Information Officer at the Royal Free Hospital, Uk, fresh before her HIMSS Discussion on 8th June, to see how they do it at her Hospital.

I am sitting in my office – I pick up the phone, and I call Katie’s Hospital, and the Reception immediately connects me, there is a sound of some children in the background, and then I realise – Katie is at home, this is her mobile line. 

“I’m sorry”, she says, there is a hint of amusement in her voice “I have the kids at home”.  No matter. And so I get straight to the point – you have been responsible for some major large clinical tech initiatives in your past – does this mean you have a technical background?

“No, “ she says immediately. “But I do know how to wire a plug”.

This is all going well.

So we start again, and you could say it gets worse. When Katie started in the NHS as what  was then a Nurse Auxiliary, at 16yrs old – there was no discussion of technology per se for people at the front line. Patients were patients and treatments were treatments. Katie’s background is clinical. It just so happened, like so many chance encounters in life, that she was rather good at explaining to patients and colleagues “what was going on”.

This facility to communicate, to bring things back to their essential levels, has been the secret sauce of what – looking back – has been a step by step process over the years, ie, the innate ability to communicate benefits and to lead others into new pastures. As clinical care has inevitably needed more and more clever toys  and cool IT, so somebody has to engage with the people who have to make it all work. At the Royal Free, under her direction, they delivered a new EHR in just 11 months.

Katie is self-deprecating; “I was just in the  right place at the right time” she says. “We sort of made a decision that we need to do this or that, and then sort of figured it out as we went along”. Clearly this is not true – but what is standout is the motivation to go forward – even though at the time, you might not be sure of what that “forward” can actually deliver.

And it has created some changes in attitudes.

“When I first got into delivering digital or clinical solutions, the mindset was definitely that “big is better”. If we want to do something else, we just got some velcro and stuck on a new module”. But our view now has changed to  scaling down, and adopting “best of breed”, a sort of FHIR approach, for the specialist areas that have specific needs.”

Katie continues; “Perhaps I was naive, but I remember when I first started, I thought that fast means better, that you just plug new solutions in. But over time, I discovered the benefit of taking it step by step. That testing and safe empowerment is a process. Sure, we can plug it in, – but everyone needs to be involved before we go play”.

What it seems is that there is a shift in areas of influence. The clinical demands of patient delivery , are becoming the driver of the IT requirement, as opposed to the other way round, And that IT per se, may not understand the clinical needs it is trying to address.

Two things are  becoming clear – and that tie in with what we have seen from other NHS Leaders that we have talked to.  That success in digital delivery, depends on the individual, and not being scared of appearing to be the idiot. It is a phrase that Katie uses a lot in our discussion – and  also the recognition that we are every day in a brave new world, and we have to sort it out.

It is time to end our discussion. We could talk for much longer, but Katie is at home, and there are noises in the background.

AHIMA launch new EU collaboration in AI and Telehealth.

The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and Frontiers Health, along with  the Healthware Group, recently agreed to a content collaboration that will serve health care professionals in both Europe and the United States.

It comes just prior to the launch of the annual AHIMA Conference, this time Virtual, in just 10 days time. (We will be talking with Michael Bittner, AHIMA Media Director, early next week, on  the key notes to be covered)  In meantime – What they say is this:

“Frontiers Health is recognized across Europe as a transformative organization with a long history of promoting innovation in health care,” said AHIMA CEO Wylecia Wiggs Harris, PhD, CAE. “Like AHIMA, they see the human behind health information and health policy, making our collaboration a natural fit.”

Frontiers Health, in cooperation with Healthware Group, is hosting two education sessions, focusing on telehealth and artificial intelligence in health care, at the AHIMA20 Virtual Conference taking place October 14-17. The sessions will feature speakers from companies like CarePredict, Intouch Group, Kaia Health, Vitality, and Wysa, as well as other global players from the digital health space.

In addition, both organizations will collaborate on sessions at the Frontiers Health Hybrid Conference this November. AHIMA’s international team will host several sessions within an overarching theme of “Data Driving the Future of Health.” AHIMA experts will discuss data consent, privacy, interoperability, patient access to their health information, and more.

“This collaboration serves AHIMA members and health care professionals in Europe, as both groups will have access to new content and resources with a global perspective,” Harris said. “It will also help AHIMA increase its international footprint and reach health care audiences around the world.”

“I am pleased to expand our collaboration with AHIMA and look forward to hosting two dedicated Frontiers Health sessions at the AHIMA20 Virtual Conference,” said Roberto Ascione, conference chairman of Frontiers Health and CEO & founder at Healthware Group. “Frontiers Health will share its extensive knowledge and first-hand experience in strategic spaces like telehealth and artificial intelligence. Through its cooperation with AHIMA, Frontiers Health will promote and contribute to the pivotal role of digital health innovation in the new normal.”

EUROVISION ON STEROIDS. WELCOME TO THE HIMSS 2020 EUROPEAN DIGITAL CONFERENCE.

With decision-makers from healthcare in some 98 Countries – including Russia, Israel etc – booked to attend; and around 172 Speakers, including 45+ keynote Speakers, including the WHO, the US ONC, and of course the key Partners from Finland (whose are supporting this Conference) – this five day event is as good as it gets in terms of bringing together where healthcare is going and needs to go.

It is an interesting comparison. This Conference is just a week or two after the Nordic more local VITALIS event in Goteborg, but whilst VITALIS is essentially inward looking, a focus for its local market – HIMSS Europe has always been an outreach for its Nordic contingent. Nothing has changed here.

When I spoke a few days ago with Sean Roberts, the VP EMEA of HIMSS, he told me that the clear focus of this year’s HIMSS Europe – is Innovation; the bringing together of the smaller and new vendors alongside their bigger and more established sponsor brothers, and taking new ways of doing things, into healthcare management.

Sean has decamped with his wife and his dog, from California to the leafy environment of Berkshire, just a 30 minute train ride into the UK capital. He is an anglophile who knows the restaurants of Chelsea even better than I. Despite the Finland original focus, the bedrock of this virtual event is a TV Studio in West London, and the biggest beneficiaries of this event may well be the domestic UK NHS. It is a journey for both of them.

What HIMSS says about itself is you can expect a “Powerful 5-day virtual experience facilitating partnerships and collaborations for digital healthcare transformation; a Unique combination of live, and “simulive” and on-demand sessions, with the opportunity to participate in live polling and Q&A throughout. Plus an Interactive, robust chat and networking capabilities that will allow you to connect with your peers and solution providers, with an unrivalled opportunity to pitch, profile and connect with key industry stakeholders”.

If there is a major and standout difference from earlier years or indeed other events organisations – it is the 3D Exhibit floor; the Lobby (see our image above) – and the virtual networking. HIMSS has been preparing for this sort of virtual reality for some years, even since the days of Steve Lieber – and you can say that COVID has been a wake up call – but looking back, it has been obvious that this is a way of interfacing that makes sense if done properly. The TV and “games” look and feel of the Lobby equals anything redolent of PS2 entertainment.

We are looking forward to the mix of protagonists as much as the Speaker advice. No doubt see you there.

GDPR. Seven essential data protection measures for Startups and Companies

The Uniscon company in Munich has sent us this timely and important warning note that – sure, our office is our home, is our kitchen, is our bedroom – but it is also the least secure of any aspect of our company data.  In the same way as Wifi based home appliances are a gateway into our personal data – so our corporate laptop on the kitchen table is the same, into our company. They set out what you need to look for;

Digital transformation of the economy has opened up many new doors for cybercriminals. Companies must take appropriate measures to protect themselves and the data of their employees, customers and partners. But what do they need to consider?

Most of the provisions of the German Federal Data Protection Act (BDSG) and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) boil down to a simple requirement: those responsible must guarantee the security of sensitive data. Violations can quickly become expensive: In the case of particularly serious data protection violations, the GDPR provides for fines of up to €20 million or up to 4% of the total annual turnover achieved worldwide (see Art. 83 GDPR). Following we present seven essential data protection measures for companies.

1. Compliance assessment
Compliance—this is, the observance of laws and regulatory requirements—affects all companies, but to different degrees. Depending on the industry, additional guidelines may apply in addition to GDPR and BDSG, for example, in the field of competition or financial law.

2. Risk assessment
As a next step, companies should carry out a risk assessment. After all, the more sensitive the data that is to be collected and/or processed, the more elaborated the measures to protect it must be. Assessments of this kind often require the support of a data protection officer.

3. Encryption
It goes without saying that sensitive data must be encrypted both during transmission and storage[1]. Sufficiently encrypted data is considered secure per se; even if data is lost, it cannot be read or recovered by attackers without the appropriate key.

4. Pseudonymization
All information that would help identify the user is removed. For example, the names of persons are replaced by randomly generated character strings. This way, the useful data remains but it no longer contains sensitive information.

5. Access controls
Introducing access controls into your company’s workflow is also an efficient method of minimizing the risk. The fewer people have access to the data, the lower the risk of accidental or deliberate data damage or loss.

6. Backups
Backups can help to prevent data loss due to user error or technical failure. They should be created and updated regularly. While regular backups add costs to your business, potential business disruptions are usually far more costly.

7. Deletion
Under the GDPR, companies are obliged to delete the data that they do not need (see art. 5 and art. 17). Consequently, companies need to draw up an appropriate deletion concept. Depending on the type of data, this concept should also specify deletion periods and durations.

“Ultimately, companies must decide, whether they take appropriate measures themselves or use the services of third-party providers specializing in data protection and data security”, says Ulrich Ganz, Director Software Engineering at TÜV SÜD’s subsidiary uniscon. “Depending on the industry, the size of the company and the type of data collected and/or processed, this can save costs and simplify processes. For example, if companies use certified services, they can prove that they already fulfill their control and due diligence obligations as required by law”. This allows companies to concentrate on their core business—and leave data protection to the experts.

Do Virtual Conferences Work?

We review the latest CX Conference from the team at IQPC London, and ask; who needs hotels when you can join in from your own bedroom?

It’s not quite what it  seems. And it may not be a case of “either/OR”…. Angela Johnson, Speaker at past Data conferences, messaged us to say that “she likes to do both, as  both have relevance”. So that’s clear then; you get a lot from just listening to Speakers and delegate questions online, from the sanctity off your office desk or home study; and you get the benefit of impromptu conversations and competitor information, from the essential face/face conference format that we all know.

But life is different now. The Virtual Conference by necessity, will become the de rigeur essential format for any conference company from, now on, for two reasons. First, conference companies have to survive, and there remains an appetite from interested corporates in accessing experience and information, even if remotely. And second – this is too good an opportunity for additional revenues, at a time when all of us are increasingly habitualised into doing everything from our homes. Why travel to a conference, when we don’t even travel any more to our own office? Ha!

The trick, is to bring together the same expert elements, regardless. And this Telco CX, Customer Experience, event, – does not disappoint.

Speakers from some of the world’s most well known corporates, including BT, T-Mobile, and delegates from equally visible brands, exchange questions and answers.

At a time when my home WIFI is intermittent at best, I found the technology to bring people together, was seamless; I had easy access from my MacBook to the presentation screens, I could hear the speakers responses. And if I popped out to walk my dog, or make a cup of tea – well, I could always go online tomorrow and revisit the whole thing.

This conference, despite its apparent customers focus – was designed around the technology to deliver benefit, or the corporate process for delivering a consumer success. It differed from earlier events, which tended to be more HR oriented.

But unlike the more conventional personal conferences, I found that there are no distractions. You log onto a Virtual conference for a reason, and I found myself listening intently to each speaker.

I missed the opportunity to chat to vendors – but I saw this as a work in progress. There are substantial avenues for Content delivery and vendor outreach and I am sure that IQPC will be developing that in due course. I have already registered for the next one in May.

Welcome to our Annual Himss Orlando 2020 Survey

The cancellation of this year’s HIMSS – has left a hole for many vendors, as to how to reach out to their necessary market, and the reverse, how can hospitals and clinicians follow what is going on?

Every year we receive about one hundred or so requests for interviews and editorials, from PR companies and their healthcare clients. We take here what we feel are the most interesting of these and most relevant, and simply tell it like it is. We publish what they themselves have to say. And we invite you to make direct contact with the vendors concerned. Access to our report will cost you around $2.00, which gos towards our costs of putting the data together for you. And you can use our search bar on our site, to find any topic that might not be immediately visible that we might have spoken about here or earlier.

So.. here we go!

WorkJam: fancy a 20-minute chat with Mark Sagurdesky, co-founder and chief product officer at WorkJam, a workforce management platform used by health providers? Mark will be at HIMSS20 in March. 

Long hours, overnight shifts and stressful work environments have long made healthcare a demanding profession – often resulting in burnout among workers, meaning increased staff turnover and decreased productivity. And while in recent years, hospitals, health systems and advocacy groups have tried to curb the problem, high rates of burnout still persist among the medical community.

With this in mind, healthcare providers must be prepared to reduce additional stress put on associates, or risk losing some of their most valuable team members. Here are a few topics Mark can discuss:

* Ways to prep and communicate with staff during an epidemic, such as the flu or coronavirus
* How to prevent and combat burnout among nurses and other associates
* Strategies healthcare providers can use to support nurses during busy seasons
* Workforce management strategies for retaining healthcare associates.

Addison, the Virtual Caregiver™, will be presented for the first time at HIMSS20. Developed by Electronic Caregiver, a 24/7 virtual care and health technology company, Addison is the game-changing solution to America’s caregiver crisis.

As the caregiver gap continues to widen, an alarming number of people will not be able to rely on loved ones to care for them in old age. According to the AARP Public Policy Institute, the population aged 45 to 64, the peak caregiving age group, is expected to increase by just 1 percent by 2030, while the population aged 80 and older will rise by a substantial 79 percent.

Not only will there be less caregivers, but an AARP study, Family Caregiving and Out-of-Pocket Costs, showed that  unpaid family caregivers spend, on average, nearly 20 percent of their personal income on out-of-pocket costs related to caring for a loved one.

Addison, a state-of-the-art, 3D animated caregiver, is designed to help fill in the gaps when a caregiver can’t be there, trimming health-related expenses and offering support for seniors and those living with chronic conditions.

CredSimple is a New York-based health-tech software company focused on credentialing, provider data, and compliance for healthcare organizations. CredSimple announced last month its acquisition of Glenridge Health, a premier technology-enabled provider network management solutions company – which now makes the company a complete end to end solution for network management for some of the biggest health care providers like Oscar and Clover. CredSimple has experienced explosive growth with 2x revenue growth each year for the past three years— and with this acquisition they are well situated to corner the marketplace.

The Macadamian company has written to us about Voice and AI. What they say is this….AI in Medical Imaging and in combination with technology such as Voice Assistants will transform healthcare workflows to the benefit of patients and clinicians alike, whilst reducing costs.

They say you can learn more at these sessions at HIMSS20:

1.Transforming Medical Imaging with Artificial Intelligence March 10th, 1:30 PM | Leadership Theater, Intelligent Health Pavillon Booth 7273
Timon LeDain, Director of Emerging Technologies, Macadamian, and Mads Jarner Brevadt, CEO Radiobotics

Commercializing AI-enabled digital health tools is a complex process. Referencing a recent solution Macadamian developed with Danish consortium partners Radiobotics and the Bispebjerg Hospital, the considerations, and lessons learned in designing, developing and undergoing clinical validation of an AI-enabled clinical decision support system will be discussed.

2. Why Great Voice AI Means Putting AI Last;
March 11th, 11:30 AM | Innovation Theater, Intelligent Health Pavillon Booth 7273 | Scott Plewes, VP User Experience & Analytics

Voice Assistant-enabled digital health solutions have already proven to benefit healthcare and evolving AI capabilities will only make them better. Still, solutions can have “great” AI and bad results. We’ll share overlooked considerations and common mistakes you need to take into account before you develop your voice AI solution.

There has been a lot of hype around the transformative nature of AI in healthcare, yet both providers and vendors are still in the midst of determining both practical use cases and how to assess and test AI algorithms to ensure the safety and efficacy of the solutions they are being integrated into.

Live demos in the Intelligent Health Pavillion
The following demos will be showcased in a guided tour that will take place throughout the day.
Chronic Disease Patient Management Platform – MiCare allows patients with managing chronic disease to track their symptoms over time with the aim to help them identify behaviors that improve or mitigate their symptoms. Clinicians on the platform can get an overview of their patients’ progress to help them identify what to focus on next in their treatment plan.

Alexa-Enabled Virtual Coaching for Diabetes Management – Macadamian’s My Diabetes Coach is a voice-first diabetes management solution that leverages a breadth of patient data to deliver automated coaching that helps a patient with diabetes better manage their condition. It also connects them with their care team and can support escalation to a diabetes educator via secure messaging.

Cloud-Based Medical Imaging Collaboration Tool – The Clini-Share portal provides a streamlined approach to diagnose patients with rare diseases. Clini-Share assembles de-identified patient MRIs, genetic information and pathology images to improve diagnosis and provide objective imaging biomarkers of disease progression and response to treatment.

Alexa Voice Control in the Operating Room: Improving Efficiency – During surgery, surgeons sometimes have requirements for additional equipment, or other items to be brought into the OR, and rely on the circulating nurse to gather these items. Being able to communicate with the circulating nurse after they have left the OR would be beneficial. The OR Alexa voice skill enables a user to speak a free form request that would be converted from speech to text and then sent to a mobile device carried by the circulating nurse.

Macadamian will be demoing their new Macadamian HealthConnect Platform as a Service that helps enable MedTech and Pharma digital innovation product development teams to accelerate the development of secure and scalable digital therapeutics, digital health applications and software-as-a-medical-device products.

We were very interested to read the following news from Annika Haberland talking about wearable remote data devices. This fits a growth in devices for such areas as clinical ECG monitoring etc. Expect to see more. What she says is;

BioIntelliSense, Inc., a continuous health monitoring and clinical intelligence company, today announces the U.S. commercial launch of its medical grade Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) platform and FDA 510(k) clearance of the BioSticker™ on-body sensor for scalable remote care. BioIntelliSense offers a new standard for Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) by combining an effortless patient experience with medical grade clinical accuracy and cost-effective data services.

The BioSticker is an advanced on-body sensor that allows for effortless continuous monitoring of vital signs and actionable insights, delivered to clinicians from patients in the home setting, thereby creating unique opportunities for early detection of potentially avoidable complications. Through the platform’s data sets and analytics, highly-efficient care is now possible at a fraction of the cost of traditional remote patient monitoring.

“We are at the inception of a remarkable new era in healthcare that will employ medical grade sensor technologies to effortlessly capture remote patient data and generate personalized clinical intelligence,” said James Mault, MD, FACS, CEO of BioIntelliSense.

BioIntelliSense is built on the foundation of a sophisticated team of engineers and data scientists with decades of expertise in wearable sensor development. With these distinctive capabilities and proprietary technologies, the company is poised to help transform care delivery under the leadership of Dr. Mault, an industry veteran who has an accomplished business and clinical career that has culminated in a number of successful connected health ventures.

BioIntelliSense has established a strategic collaboration with UCHealth and its CARE Innovation Center to demonstrate the value and clinical applications of the BioSticker device and medical-grade services. This alliance is committed to developing and validating new models of data-driven care that are patient-centered and built for scale.

“The future of healthcare will see the lines blurred between the hospital, clinic and home,” said Dr. Richard Zane, UCHealth Chief Innovation Officer and Chair of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “The use of the BioSticker device for continuous health monitoring enables us to monitor a patient in their home and recognize when a patient may have an exacerbation of illness even before they manifest symptoms. This may reduce hospitalizations, emergency department visits and shorten hospital stays, creating cost efficiencies for health systems.”

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And Axel Wirth of the Medcrypt company, is leading a session Cybersecurity: To be Proactive or Reactive, that is the Question, on. 1:15pm – 2:00pm Thursday, March 12, at Hall A – Booth 400 – Cybersecurity Theater A. What he will discuss is:

“Building a capable security organization and infrastructure is often driven by trade-off decisions and compromise. How does one achieve optimal security by balancing investment into technology vs. process? “ Using the industry’s current approach to securing medical devices as an example, this session will analyze current capabilities and examine evidence on whether we are on the right track or if an adjustment of our strategy is required.
The aim is to discuss the current approach to securing our medical device ecosystem identify, based on subjective evidence, the strength and weaknesses of the current industry strategy, and describe how to differentiate the advantages and disadvantages of the respective elements used.

 

ends.

As said generally, we at ProfoMedia make no endorsement of any of the above – but we recognise the need for any vendor to have airtime and visibility. We are pleased to help where we can.

Is AI finally getting traction in Healthcare?

Ahead of Rare Disease Day (Feb 29), Ashley Yum has written to us,  to offer us the opportunity to speak with Steve Costalas, CEO, HVH Precision Analytics, about how AI and machine learning are being used to help diagnose rare diseases faster and more accurately.

HVH Precision Analytics is a joint venture between the world’s largest health and wellness network Havas Health & You , and Vencore,  and specializes in AI and machine learning data analytics.

At a time when take up of AI in healthcare is surprisingly low, this collaboration is looking at  how AI/big data can identify symptoms of disease 3-5 years before diagnosis, – and using RWD and RWE to find undiagnosed patients in healthcare databases – and finally, – · leveraging data to support the rare disease community beyond diagnosis.

And they have some interesting side announcements, if you will…

95% of rare diseases do not have an FDA-approved treatment, significantly limiting treatment options for the 400 million people living with a rare disease.

7,000 rare diseases have been identified, but only 5% have FDA-approved treatments.

The total number of Americans living with a rare disease is estimated at between 25-30 million.

The average time it takes for rare disease patients to receive an accurate diagnosis is 4.8 years.

However, they are  excited about the progress that’s been made in recent years thanks to AI, and  they would love to share  what they  think is in store for the future.

Ashley can be contacted at; ashley.yum@HVHprecision.com