Digital Therapeutics and Care at Home. Webinar 3rd June.

We focus on the latest  EHTEL’s “Second Imagining 2029*” webinar. This virtual meeting is part of the EHTEL Innovation Initiative agenda for 2020 on Exploring Digital Therapeutics, Artificial Intelligence, and Virtual Coaches.

With the Imagining 2029 series of webinars – hosted by its working groups – EHTEL invites the digital health community to reflect jointly on accelerating digital transformation – acknowledging the opportunities and challenges raised by the current COVID-19 crisis. This is what they say;

Given today’s situation in which health systems, and especially hospitals, need to manage ever more knowledge and increasing amount of data, they are faced with a number of challenges. These relate to e.g., increasing clinical benefits, providing treatment in a variety of locations (in the hospital itself, in new forms of hospitals, at home), and involving health and care staff effectively in the changes occurring.

The objectives of this first webinar on digital therapeutics and care at home are to:explore how, throughout Europe, care is shifting from the hospital to the home, explore what digital therapeutics has to offer in terms of this paradigm shift, and identify in what ways AI and digital therapeutics work together.

The Date: Wednesday 3 June 2020, Time: 12:00 – 13:30 CET (90 min)

The first part of the webinar is a brief welcome and introduction by TicSalutSocial member, Juan Guanyabens, and EHTEL Principal eHealth Policy Analyst, Diane Whitehouse.

The shift of care from hospital to home: Example 1 – Presenter: Astrid van der Velde and Ed de Kluiver, Isala Heart Centre, Netherlands (NWE-Chance).

The shift of care from hospital to home: Example 2  – Presenters: Massimo Caprino and Riccardo Re, Casa di Cura del Policlinico – CCP, Italy (vCare).

What digital therapeutics has to offer and the relationship between AI and digital therapeutics. – Presenter: John Crawford, CrawfordWorks, United Kingdom and EHTEL Honorary Member.

The discussion will be based around several key questions, that should provide concrete evidence of developments in the field. After the discussion, the moderators will summarise the key messages of the webinar as preliminary conclusions.

We Are What We Eat

We catch up with Nutrition Consultant Olga Preston, about how what we eat, impacts how we behave.

We are not talking about getting tetchy in the morning, – although that may be the case. This is serious stuff. We are at the sharp end of solving and reducing symptoms of, serious mental health issues, by understanding, analysing, and even rejecting, the food that we have queued for at the supermarket just a few days before.

And it’s not that Olga does not have experience of these issues. As a former nutrition specialist with the Brain Bio Centre in Putney London – and now branching out on her own, with her own portfolio of patients, Olga is convincing as she talks to me by phone.

“You know that sugar makes you anxious?” She says.

I didn’t know that. Neither did I know that my favourite pasta carbonara is also less than ideal.

“You need some chicken and steamed vegetables”.

I demurred asking her about my glass of Chardonnay in the evening. But what is clear is that, once you get beneath the recipe and menu level of conversation, there is an increasing awareness by all of us at a community level, that by just changing a few things in our diet, we can reduce the mental issues that also seem to be on the increase. And these are the issues that conventional medicine, with its dumbing down side effects, seems powerless to handle.

Apparently, NHS GPs do not normally refer patients who they feel have mental issues, – to a Nutritional Therapist Nutritional Therapist, despite the latter qualifications.

Olga’s patients are referred by private clinics. She specialises in children issues, particularly autism and ADHD, with a small reserve area for adults with depression and psychosis. he will shortly have a separate facility at the ION Clinic in Richmond. We talk about other influences, the use of Music to stimulate people with brain issues, etc, and what she says is that people are now comfortable and accepting that there are different therapeutic tools, to do different jobs.

Olga is an an accomplished Seminar speaker – and I don’t want to delay her any longer. I think about grabbing a large sandwich at the train station, but apparently too much bread is not great for me either.

Olga can be contacted directly at; olgaprestonnutrition@gmail.com

What Do We Mean by “Digital Health?

The recent announcement below from the HIMSS organisation of new advances in monitoring your health, digitally, – or progress within clinics and hospitals in having the tech to do so – gives rise to two questions; first, what on earth are we talking about?  and second – do our hospitals care anyway?

The Coronavirus situation has given rise to every flavour of new monitoring solution, but this misses the essential point that Coronavirus will not be here, at least in terms of dominating our health – too much longer (apparently) – which means that we need to get back to basics of; what does “digital”, actually mean.

Location Intelligence. A Life-Saver as well as a Business Advantage

We are pleased to publish the announcement of a relevant Seminar from the guys at Esri.com, who do the ArcGIS mapping software. Now you can see the problem areas of Coronavirus – at a place near you. Or hopefully not near. And you can plan accordingly.  Robby Deming, their Senior Media Strategist writes to us: 

“I wanted to let you know about an opportunity to connect with Esri’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Este Geraghty about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mapping and analysis.”

New Advances in Coronavirus solutions. Such a Pity…

We look at the equal march of COVID-19 and solutions that describe themselves as being “the answer”, and ask;   Why has it taken this long for them to come to the fore… and is COVID-19 the excuse of choice, for both marketeers, and people who didn’t want to go to work anyway.

Medical Grade Wearable Devices for vital signs Continuous Monitoring

The need for a mobile and wearable clinical device – to take the pressure off our clinics and hospitals – has never been greater. It’s not like  there is no need.  The problem, so to say has been twofold; the reluctance of hospitals and staff to embrace a new technology that appears to reduce their personal involvement; and the lack of absolute clinical quality.  Sure, we have our Apple Watches, but that does not make us all doctors.

But things are changing. We look at the new wearable watch from CardiacSense, and ask, has the time now come for clinical grade solutions in the palm of our hand or on our wrist?  Eyal Copitt, COO of CardiacSense, latest manufacturer of a watch and wristband within the heart monitoring space,  explains what they do in these difficult times. This is what he says;

——

Rapid expansion of the Coronavirus emphasizes the immediate need for long-term continuous remote monitoring of vital signs to closely monitor the conditions of those infected with the Corona virus.

Coronavirus patients suffer from high core temperature, high respiratory rate, high heart rate and low Oxygen saturation

The need for monitoring is at hospital for badly ill patients as well as at home for lightly ill people.
Devices with wireless communication allows hospital and home monitoring without the need for direct contact of medical staff and patients.

The CardiacSense watch and wristband have them all,  – core temperature, highest accuracy measurement of heart rate, respiratory rate, SpO2as well as absolute cuff-less blood pressure and arrythmia detection and wireless communication.

The above turns CardiacSense watch and wristband to be the ultimate affordable continuous monitoring solution for inpatients and outpatients, sending real-time measurements to the nurses station and receiving back written instructions from the medical staff through the device screen whether the patient being in the hospital or at home.

Using the CardiacSense watch and wristband medical grade continuous monitoring enables better monitoring and communication for isolated inpatients reducing staff infection risk and allows light coronavirus patients stay at home, while the monitored data being auto sent to the hospital’s monitoring center.

Eyal can be contacted at; Eyal@cardiacsense.com.

IS OUR NEW REALITY – A REALLY GOOD IDEA?

It is a fact not commonly understood, that a business that battens down the hatches in times of troubles, will end up in a worse place when the troubles are over – than from where it started. We look at how today’s problems can be tomorrow’s answers.

Welcome to our Annual Himss Orlando 2020 Survey

The cancellation of this year’s HIMSS 2020 – has left a hole for many vendors, as to how to reach out to their necessary market, and the reverse, how can hospitals and clinicians follow what is going on?

Every year we receive about one hundred or so requests for interviews and editorials, from PR companies and their healthcare clients. We take here what we feel are the most interesting of these and most relevant, and simply tell it like it is. We publish what they themselves have to say. And we invite you to make direct contact with the vendors concerned. Access to our report will cost you around $2.00, which goes towards our costs of putting the data together for you. And you can use our search bar on our site, to find any topic that might not be immediately visible that we might have spoken about here or earlier.

So.. here we go!

Is AI finally getting traction in Healthcare?

Ahead of Rare Disease Day (Feb 29), Ashley Yum has written to us,  to offer us the opportunity to speak with Steve Costalas, CEO, HVH Precision Analytics, about how AI and machine learning are being used to help diagnose rare diseases faster and more accurately.

HVH Precision Analytics is a joint venture between the world’s largest health and wellness network Havas Health & You , and Vencore,  and specializes in AI and machine learning data analytics.

At a time when take up of AI in healthcare is surprisingly low, this collaboration is looking at  how AI/big data can identify symptoms of disease 3-5 years before diagnosis, – and using RWD and RWE to find undiagnosed patients in healthcare databases – and finally, – · leveraging data to support the rare disease community beyond diagnosis.

And they have some interesting side announcements, if you will…

95% of rare diseases do not have an FDA-approved treatment, significantly limiting treatment options for the 400 million people living with a rare disease.

7,000 rare diseases have been identified, but only 5% have FDA-approved treatments.

The total number of Americans living with a rare disease is estimated at between 25-30 million.

The average time it takes for rare disease patients to receive an accurate diagnosis is 4.8 years.

However, they are  excited about the progress that’s been made in recent years thanks to AI, and  they would love to share  what they  think is in store for the future.

Ashley can be contacted at; ashley.yum@HVHprecision.com

Why Inclusion & Diversity Is An Executive Priority

Creating inclusive, respectful and engaging workplace cultures is essential for an organisation’ success. Seems just right on paper but how do companies define and create this culture, empowering employees to feel motivated?