HIMSS 2018 – What to Look Out For…

As usual, we are pleased to do our annual Advance Report on those Announcements that have caught our attention.

Best among many, are Dave Anderson, and Stephanie Fraser, – who have made respective polite efforts to reach out to us on behalf of their respective clients EHNAC, and  GDPR people Nextgate, and Moran Faibish and her very interesting Healthwatchtech company. But there are dozens of others, and here are just a few:

• Influence Health’s CEO, Rupen Patel and CHRISTUS Health’s VP of marketing, Preston Gee, will also be presenting on 3/7 @ 11:30 am in Palazzo B (ID: 140) – A New Era: The CMO’s Role at the Healthcare Consumerism Table. Both executives are available to address how the consumerization of healthcare is fundamentally changing the way healthcare organizations need to market themselves by creating Amazon-like experiences for patients, or risk losing market share.

• Greenway Health, which recently earned the highest KLAS rating for Ambulatory Revenue Cycle Management Services, Small Clinics, will be announcing its next phase of Project Polaris, a next-generation practice management and EHR platform that will combine the best attributes from all of the company’s market-driven solutions to help providers effectively leverage a value-based healthcare environment for greater success.

Peter Hesse, 10Pearls’ CSO, will be presenting Magnetic PX: Building Secure, Engaging Experience, and would be happy to chat about the importance of security in providing patient experiences. He can also discuss how healthcare companies will need to adjust to meet HIPPA requirements as they implement emerging technologies such as AI and ML.

Ghazanfar Ghori, 10Pearls’ CTO, will be attending the event and available to discuss the solutions that his team has developed for their healthcare clients, such as HIPAA-compliant telehealth solutions that deliver care to patients in rural areas, online communities that connect caregivers to resources, and voice enabled AI applications capable of detecting dementia.

You can also arrange a meeting with data management provider Commvault’s General Manager of Worldwide Healthcare Business, Ananth Balasubramanian while at the show.

Ananth is available during the conference and can discuss, but not limited to:
·         What HIT executives must know about GDPR ahead of May’s deadline, and how they can become compliant
·         What HIT executives must know about ransomware, and how they can protect their organization and patients from increasingly savvy hackers
·         What HIT executives should know if they are considering migrating data to the cloud, and how to most strategically plan this (multi-cloud vs. public vs. private)
·         How healthcare entities can prepare and future-proof amid looming uncertainty as the administration deliberates how to make changes to healthcare reforms
·         Amazon / JP Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway’s new healthcare behemoth, and what it could potentially mean for the broader industry
·         How Commvault’s customers, such as Prime Healthcare and Montgomery County Memorial Hospital (and their patients) are benefitting from stronger, more secure data protection, recovery, backup and management in the cloud and on-premises.

David Dimond, CTO, and Dan Trott, Healthcare Field Director, Dell EMC Healthcare and Life Sciences, will also be there:

David and Dan will be onsite to discuss:
• Embracing a Digital Future and a supporting study commissioned by Dell EMC with Vanson Bourne Research
• Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption
• Changes in the healthcare technology landscape and high-profile mergers
• Leveraging multi-cloud environments

Dell EMC executives will be available to host industry discussions, providing perspective on these themes and how they support digital transformation in an ever-changing healthcare field. Along with these discussions, Dell EMC will host a number of interactive technology experiences, social media activities and customer events.

Courtney Cohen writes to say that; AI and natural language processing is starting to make waves in the healthcare space and Health Fidelity, industry leaders in providing scalable risk adjustment solutions, is bringing the technology to providers to use in a way like never before, such as discovering chronic conditions.

Why not come to meet with the Health Fidelity company, to discuss the advances NLP is making, as well as their recent partnership with Mount Sinai.

And then there are nice and polite invites; Amy Dardinger writes; The past few years, interoperability and AI have been the biggest trending topics at HIMSS. Many organizations are starting to get their systems in order, collecting more data points every day. This makes it even more difficult to synthesize the information to make it accessible and meaningful for healthcare providers.

Would you be interested in speaking with Gary Palgon, VP Healthcare and Life Science Solutions at Liaison Technologies, at HIMSS about the complexities of data integration in healthcare?

We invite any of our Readers to makle direct contact with any of the above vendors.  We are simply passing on what they themselves are saying, without obligation or endorsement – They have taken their trouble to write to us.  But equally there are dozens more. We will be producing our annual Report of HIMSS, towards the end of March 2018, but please contact us if you are looking for any specific health tech, and we will be pleased to point you where possible in the right direction.



Conferences – do we need them?

We look at the need to get together and ask – does it work?

Conferences are big business. A casual search for any vertical mix of “meeting point”, be it by topic or geography, could keep you and I continually doing the rounds of expensive hotels and free lunches everyday except weekends, until midway thru 2019 – and we haven’t even got through January some twelve months earlier.

Either the common understanding is that; conferences work. Or we are simply creatures of habit, we go because we always did.

Except that, for many – conferences, and the mini exhibitions that accompany these – deliver very little. Particularly for vendors, who splash out large sums but frequently tell us its a lot of cost for what ultimately does not deliver. And similarly for delegates – why is it that Speakers who should know by now how to communicate their corporate benefits, are so frequently unprepared, whose presentations are just so dull? Is it – to put it another way, there are simply better ways of achieving your goal – be it sales prospecting, market info, meeting your peers – than by jumping on the cattle run.

Then again – judging by the highly competent lists of theoretically highly competent decision-makers that always herald every getting-together – these guys would not do it, if it didn’t work. The answer, is to pick and choose the meetings where a/ you want to be visible; and b/ where the delegates that surround you are actually worth meeting.

And sure, there are the classic industry standard get-togethers, that are like the perennial flowers in my front garden. its the same people, the same format, the same booths, the same visibility. If you are not there, then people “assume” you are not anywhere. I am not talking about these. You can put healthcare, and hospitality into those boxes. There are many more.

The trick is to identify conferences that are addressing an actual market need. Nowhere is this more obvious and important, than in the technology arena. And these conferences too are changing. If 2016/2017 were the years of Big Data, and then GDPR – we are now seeing the more discussion based formulae. These are the meetings that you need to go to, because they deliver original thinking.

It has long been recognised that the real hidden benefit of this level of conference – is the casual networking, the informal discussion. Best among the upcoming conferences is the Future of Finance 2018 Discussion, on Feb 19th in London. Organised by IQPC, this promises to be an innovative forum based event, that brings together the people that can shape the industry, and where you can play a part. Worth registering.




Is it already too late for GDPR?

We look at how industries are preparing, and ask – have businesses already moved on?

For the past two years, whole industries ranging from Conference Organisers, to newly articulate Vendors – have sprung up professing abilities and proficiencies to help us manage the data compliance of GDPR – coming live in just a few months.

And their message may have been getting through. In Scandinavia, you cannot find any free Consultants able to take on any new projects. In our calls to UK vendors, few even answered our calls.  If past history is anything to go by, companies typically leave things to the last minute – so maybe there will be this rush to the final hurdle when the deadline May comes around.

Or maybe there won’t. According to Richard Copland, Partner at The Future Shapers – those companies that were going to do something – have already done so. The concern over GDPR among the large corporates where this can matter – has already been dealt with and life is moivinbg on to more important areas of data handling.

This mirrors our own experience. In interviews we have had in the Financials and Insurance areas, the need is not for data compliance.  The concern is how to identify key bits of customers information that can  make a commercial difference. In other words, technology  and IT is not the problem any more;  we are getting back to basics of – what drives our businesses and above all, what will give these companies a commercial edge.

Interestingly,  Trade Conferences per se are no longer seen as the giver of new comparative information, because it is rare to find vendors who genuinely have anything new to say.  Whilst there are exceptions to this,  their importance is in the casual networking of vendor to delegate and delegate to delegate.

Where this takes us in the future – is that 2018 will be the catalyst for specific vendors who genuinely have a new vision and a new take on their market. Linking technology to commercial benefit, will be the difference.

eHealth and Digitalisation at Work

The big question at HIMSS Europe in Malta just 8 months ago – was that “eHealth is all very well as a concept  – but how does it work in practice?”  We publish the recent announcement of Hospitals that are at the forefront of this process, for you to see what they are doing – and learn from that?

We will be present and covering HIMSS at Las Vegas in March. If you want a specific report about those Hospitals and Vendors that fit your own needs for 2018 – talk to us soonest – we will be pleased to help!

HIMSS Davies Award Recipients

The following 2017 HIMSS Davies Award of Excellence recipients have been announced:

Explore the links above to view each organization’s press release and to learn about their award-winning use cases. Keep checking Health IT Pulse for the remaining award recipient announcements. All HIMSS Davies Award recipients will be recognized at the HIMSS18 Awards Gala .

`Cebit 2018 and the Public Sector

If you work in the public sector, in particular local and regional government – here is why you need a quick day in Hannover this Spring.

We republish here the announcement just a few days ago, from Cebit Press Office – detailing their focus on German public authorities, and the need for Digital platforms.


Cebit is exhausting at best of times, but focussing on public need, is great if you are a vendor of Data Analysis and GDPR solutions;  and very helpful if you work in the public sector and wish to engage with like minds.



We look at the established management processes in Uk hospitals, and ask – are they no longer fit for purpose? And if not – what can be done?

If hospitals are going to continue to be relevant – then from the recent  interviews and discussions we have had – hospital Management need to change their way of dealing with things. This conclusion is sometimes hidden in the general anarchy of most hospitals. And to be fair, there is always going to be frisson among people. So it is difficult to see when the moment arrives, that “something actually has to be done,” in that it can’t be put off any longer.

This article was born out of two things; first, the use of mobile data and mobile computing, that transfers ownership of the medical process from the hospital, to the patient; and second, the absolute need to reduce costs, in a hospital. I am going to answer this back to front.

The “reducing costs” argument simply says “well, we carry on as we are”. This does not work, but it does give the impression of not spending new money. It also panders to the complete lack of accountable decision making in so many UK hospitals. What’s there not to love?

Ironically, the more problematic, is the hospital that at last tries to do something about things, – and employs third party professional advice. This generally produces great Reports which can be signed off by Management, but it also produces recommendations to acquire new IT – which if this is from a framework, will already be out of date; or worse, will require months of Consulting to render useful the Consulting company’s favourite technology. Conventional thinking says that It is in no Consulting companies’ commercial interests, simply to produce a Report. But maybe it is; the role of the Consulting company is about Business Process – not about Clinical IT

The Game Changer is the first point above; the transfer of decision making to the Patient, or “consumer”, – has given rise to a plethora of more Apps, and iPad based processes, that no longer require the bits of flex and late nights trying to cobble together disparate linked systems. The good people of Apple and Google have done it all for us, thanks for asking.

What is more important, is that it is now possible to link costs of processes, with improved patient care.

In theory – this is not a difficult step. The problem, tho – is that Hospitals need to take that step, and engage in a completely new set of discussions, where there are no rules, and adopt flexible practices that need not be set in stone. It has to be this way, because patient lifestyles are changing with ever increasing frequency.

We see increasingly large numbers of ordinary people voting with their feet, so to say, and paying money that many cannot afford, for routine services now offered by the private sector. We also see increases in regional populations and increased demand from elderly people, that can be better managed remotely. In that case, it is entirely conceivable that we will obtain our healthcare from anywhere in the world. Who needs our hospitals anyway?

This would be a pity. Clinical excellence depends on excellence at all levels of the management process. UK Hospitals have been amongst the best in the world. It is entirely possible for them to remain so.


We look at changing demands within the UK NHS

I am going to start this all back-to-front. My suggestion is; simply giving the NHS “more money” – is cementing out of date working practices. The problem is – there are things called “patients”. There are more of them, and they are being quite unreasonable by living a lot longer than they should. This is redolent of my Data discussions about relational databases; they are just to clunky to handle the volume of patient data we have (so goes the argument). If Hospitals are going to continue to be relevant, then they need to start with a blank piece of paper, adopt radical new ways of doing things, and that includes how they pay for stuff. Putting in place new practices is inextricably linked to finding innovative ways of paying for them.

The problem is – people don’t like change. Nobody likes change. Our comfort zone is precisely that; why not keep things the same? The common unspoken argument goes something like – It’s all worked more or less, up to now.

Except that it doesn’t any longer. As indicated above – there are just too many people wanting healthcare. And if you believe the guys at CIFS in Denmark, “hospitals” are no longer in the driving seat anyway; it is the patient – or “consumer” – that is increasingly driving us to adopt new facilities and services for which we have no plan and no budget.

But maybe we don’t need a budget. Maybe we should just” do”. One way around this obstacle, is the following:

My colleague, who is a Head of Finance at a major UK Trust – sips his coffee and says; “you know , Richard, – apart from essential capital costs – we have stopped making big budget procurements. We now pay as we go. Suppliers enter into flexible monthly contracts, and we pay for what we use.”

Companies in the UK such as System C, are already looking at these sort of innovative practices; similarly in Scandinavia, the EVRY company now offers iPad based versions of its solutions for smaller clinics, based on a mobile SIM tariff. This is the tip of a very large iceberg

And it is seismic; it brings to an end the five-year contract, the large software acquisition. It means that suppliers can no longer promise to deliver but never deliver (we have seen this several times) – or supply goods and never train their hospitals (and we have seen this too). It also means that as hospital flexible demands change, – so can their supplier, and in real-time.

There are two win/wins here. The first is that hospitals can now engage in new technology Pilots, to prove clinical concepts and prove commercial viability, without fear of long term commitment. It means there need no longer be a “budget hiatus” every year, around now, that delay the introduction of new services that clinicians are desperately calling for.

A direct result of the mobile world we live in, is that increasingly, suppliers are linking their offer to commercial or clinical results in some way. This is important, because it allows much better monitoring; the introduction of new services can be far better and much more simply controlled – with the minimisation of implicit greater risk.

But it also means that hospital management needs to throw out the hostility that routinely surfaces towards the very organisations that are able to help. For this quiet revolution to happen, there needs to be what I will call a “Scandinavian Partnership” model, of engagement. It is an ironic description; Scandinavian procurements and “upphandlings” are some of the most heavily legally monitored in the world – but that in itself misses the point.

In a world where you and I are now able to tell our Doctor and Hospital what they need for us – who needs a procurement process anyway? Just go and do it.