eHealth and Digitalisation at Work

The big question at HIMSS Europe in Malta just 8 months ago – was that “eHealth is all very well as a concept  – but how does it work in practice?”  We publish the recent announcement of Hospitals that are at the forefront of this process, for you to see what they are doing – and learn from that?

We will be present and covering HIMSS at Las Vegas in March. If you want a specific report about those Hospitals and Vendors that fit your own needs for 2018 – talk to us soonest – we will be pleased to help!

HIMSS Davies Award Recipients

The following 2017 HIMSS Davies Award of Excellence recipients have been announced:

Explore the links above to view each organization’s press release and to learn about their award-winning use cases. Keep checking Health IT Pulse for the remaining award recipient announcements. All HIMSS Davies Award recipients will be recognized at the HIMSS18 Awards Gala .

`Cebit 2018 and the Public Sector

If you work in the public sector, in particular local and regional government – here is why you need a quick day in Hannover this Spring.

We republish here the announcement just a few days ago, from Cebit Press Office – detailing their focus on German public authorities, and the need for Digital platforms.

https://www.cebit.de/en/press/press-releases/article_7936

Cebit is exhausting at best of times, but focussing on public need, is great if you are a vendor of Data Analysis and GDPR solutions;  and very helpful if you work in the public sector and wish to engage with like minds.

 

IS EXPEDIENCY THE BARRIER TO PROGRESS IN UK HOSPITALS?

We look at the established management processes in Uk hospitals, and ask – are they no longer fit for purpose? And if not – what can be done?

If hospitals are going to continue to be relevant – then from the recent  interviews and discussions we have had – hospital Management need to change their way of dealing with things. This conclusion is sometimes hidden in the general anarchy of most hospitals. And to be fair, there is always going to be frisson among people. So it is difficult to see when the moment arrives, that “something actually has to be done,” in that it can’t be put off any longer.

This article was born out of two things; first, the use of mobile data and mobile computing, that transfers ownership of the medical process from the hospital, to the patient; and second, the absolute need to reduce costs, in a hospital. I am going to answer this back to front.

The “reducing costs” argument simply says “well, we carry on as we are”. This does not work, but it does give the impression of not spending new money. It also panders to the complete lack of accountable decision making in so many UK hospitals. What’s there not to love?

Ironically, the more problematic, is the hospital that at last tries to do something about things, – and employs third party professional advice. This generally produces great Reports which can be signed off by Management, but it also produces recommendations to acquire new IT – which if this is from a framework, will already be out of date; or worse, will require months of Consulting to render useful the Consulting company’s favourite technology. Conventional thinking says that It is in no Consulting companies’ commercial interests, simply to produce a Report. But maybe it is; the role of the Consulting company is about Business Process – not about Clinical IT

The Game Changer is the first point above; the transfer of decision making to the Patient, or “consumer”, – has given rise to a plethora of more Apps, and iPad based processes, that no longer require the bits of flex and late nights trying to cobble together disparate linked systems. The good people of Apple and Google have done it all for us, thanks for asking.

What is more important, is that it is now possible to link costs of processes, with improved patient care.

In theory – this is not a difficult step. The problem, tho – is that Hospitals need to take that step, and engage in a completely new set of discussions, where there are no rules, and adopt flexible practices that need not be set in stone. It has to be this way, because patient lifestyles are changing with ever increasing frequency.

We see increasingly large numbers of ordinary people voting with their feet, so to say, and paying money that many cannot afford, for routine services now offered by the private sector. We also see increases in regional populations and increased demand from elderly people, that can be better managed remotely. In that case, it is entirely conceivable that we will obtain our healthcare from anywhere in the world. Who needs our hospitals anyway?

This would be a pity. Clinical excellence depends on excellence at all levels of the management process. UK Hospitals have been amongst the best in the world. It is entirely possible for them to remain so.

IS IT THE END OF THE THE BIG-BUDGET PROCUREMENT PROCESS?

We look at changing demands within the UK NHS

I am going to start this all back-to-front. My suggestion is; simply giving the NHS “more money” – is cementing out of date working practices. The problem is – there are things called “patients”. There are more of them, and they are being quite unreasonable by living a lot longer than they should. This is redolent of my Data discussions about relational databases; they are just to clunky to handle the volume of patient data we have (so goes the argument). If Hospitals are going to continue to be relevant, then they need to start with a blank piece of paper, adopt radical new ways of doing things, and that includes how they pay for stuff. Putting in place new practices is inextricably linked to finding innovative ways of paying for them.

The problem is – people don’t like change. Nobody likes change. Our comfort zone is precisely that; why not keep things the same? The common unspoken argument goes something like – It’s all worked more or less, up to now.

Except that it doesn’t any longer. As indicated above – there are just too many people wanting healthcare. And if you believe the guys at CIFS in Denmark, “hospitals” are no longer in the driving seat anyway; it is the patient – or “consumer” – that is increasingly driving us to adopt new facilities and services for which we have no plan and no budget.

But maybe we don’t need a budget. Maybe we should just” do”. One way around this obstacle, is the following:

My colleague, who is a Head of Finance at a major UK Trust – sips his coffee and says; “you know , Richard, – apart from essential capital costs – we have stopped making big budget procurements. We now pay as we go. Suppliers enter into flexible monthly contracts, and we pay for what we use.”

Companies in the UK such as System C, are already looking at these sort of innovative practices; similarly in Scandinavia, the EVRY company now offers iPad based versions of its solutions for smaller clinics, based on a mobile SIM tariff. This is the tip of a very large iceberg

And it is seismic; it brings to an end the five-year contract, the large software acquisition. It means that suppliers can no longer promise to deliver but never deliver (we have seen this several times) – or supply goods and never train their hospitals (and we have seen this too). It also means that as hospital flexible demands change, – so can their supplier, and in real-time.

There are two win/wins here. The first is that hospitals can now engage in new technology Pilots, to prove clinical concepts and prove commercial viability, without fear of long term commitment. It means there need no longer be a “budget hiatus” every year, around now, that delay the introduction of new services that clinicians are desperately calling for.

A direct result of the mobile world we live in, is that increasingly, suppliers are linking their offer to commercial or clinical results in some way. This is important, because it allows much better monitoring; the introduction of new services can be far better and much more simply controlled – with the minimisation of implicit greater risk.

But it also means that hospital management needs to throw out the hostility that routinely surfaces towards the very organisations that are able to help. For this quiet revolution to happen, there needs to be what I will call a “Scandinavian Partnership” model, of engagement. It is an ironic description; Scandinavian procurements and “upphandlings” are some of the most heavily legally monitored in the world – but that in itself misses the point.

In a world where you and I are now able to tell our Doctor and Hospital what they need for us – who needs a procurement process anyway? Just go and do it.

 

New Human Relationships in Customer Contact

We look at the upcoming  CCW Conference in Glasgow in March, and ask – has this Conference really changed things  This is what they say about themselves:

”Delivering world class services has never been more critical as today’s businesses continue to be disrupted with new technologies and competition. Multi channel is the new norm, contact centres face more complex queries, operating models urgently need to be reorganized and super agents need to be created!

Partnering with business to deliver insights and world class service is a major step for customer contact to become more strategic in customer centric transformation. In the age of digital, providing that human touch to both your customers and employees will be the winning recipe. We invite you to join us at Customer Contact Week 2018 where key strategies are shared and the future is shaped.

CCW Europe will see 60+ executive speakers, 25 industry and challenge focused IDGs, 9 plenary sessions and dedicated streams and discussions tackling how to deliver world class service through intelligent customer contact without losing the human touch. You cannot afford to miss out! “

There is no doubt that a more human response in the automated call centres that have populated our life, will deliver.

But the question is – has the market already moved on?  Most people – particularly in the areas of financial services, banking, utilities, would much prefer their vendors and suppliers to go the whole hog, bring back the human face, bring back the local branch. At a time when there is a growing focus on the “Community” – so there is now a need, and a market, for the back to basics of human engagement, – rather than the image of human engagement. It is still faster to buy a train ticket by rolling up at a local train station than trying to buy said ticket on line, and you get the happy start of someone actually face to face being nice to you. Pay it Forward actually works.

Plus, there are added side benefits of this back to normality approach, the obvious one is in retail, the avoidance of plastic packaging and delivery services is becoming a major factor in saving the planet both from the ocean and emissions points of view.

And then again – maybe the answer is a mix, and it comes down to service. A key speaker at the above Conference is from the MOO Organisation – where we ourselves have now migrated to buying all of our cards and print (in stead of our local print shop down the road).

Will we be going?  Yes of course.  But let’s get serious;  online customer contact will never be as good for most situations, as the real thing. And Glasgow is a great place to go visit.

It’s Time to Think About Christmas…

We look at those Christmas Parties that actually make sense…

Actually – frankly speaking – there aren’t many. I would like to say that Christmas for all and everyone is a spirit of goodwill to all men, a time of renewal and friendship. And I would be wrong. For most companies, the annual “Christmas Party” is the minefield of alcohol bad taste, political scheming that rivals Machiavelli in his prime, and moments of deep despair that hit those who awake the next morning, and wonder – “did I really say that to Sophie in Accounts”?

No wonder that so many Trade Associations in Paris prefer to have their annual “Soirée”, in the middle of June. At least when you wake up the next day, you can disappear on vacation down to Chatelaillon. Hopefully it will all be forgotten by the time you get back for the Rentree.

And then there is COSSIOM – whose annual “Get-together” is the model of what business events should be, and where aspiration of actually enjoying oneself – is merged with business networking, for people who know about business networking.

How so?

Because COSSIOM understands that the driver of its flagship event – is business, not hospitality. That people in the Data world that it brings together, – as much as one always likes a glass of champagne – rarely have time to enjoy said glass of champagne. Life is already too stressed. COSSIOM is a soirée for people that value the individual minutes of their day enough to know that the chance discussion, the accidental meeting, that the COSSIOM event delivers, are as valuable as the specific meeting of old and goods friends and clients that have been fostered over the past year.
For that reason, COSSIOM every November has no need to market itself itself as a “business event”. Their website and invitation just says; “Hey guys, just come along!” The people who do “come along”, already know the rules of the game.

Which means that COSSIOM can reach out from the large corporate environment that is its core – to use its Soirée to benefit charity. It is a time of practical giving-back, as well as a random evening of receiving.
As I mentioned somewhere earlier – this is about Goodwill to All Men. What’s there not to love?

Happy Christmas!

Time for Digital Transformation. We look at the new Report from Logicalis.

NEW YORK, November 15, 2017 –

Just a year after we published our own assessment that the CIO remains the biggest barrier to corporate improvement, we have received the following from the Logicalis company. According to the results of their new  global survey, CIOs around the globe are more determined than ever to achieve digital transformation within their organizations despite setbacks experienced over the past year. Logicalis is an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com) and is making the survey results available online at their  website. You can ownload a copy of the 2017/2018 Logicalis Global CIO Survey here: http://ow.ly/jVfZ30gzqws.

And what they conclude, is this:

The survey, which polled 890 CIOs across 23 countries, unearthed surprising findings this year. Although CIOs are determined to achieve digital transformation, optimism about their strides toward success has waned over the last 12 months. While only 11 percent report their organizations have “no desire” for transformation, those that ideologically embrace digital transformation have made only minimal advancements to date:

* Just 5 percent classify their organizations as “digital innovators,” down from 6 percent in last year’s survey.
* Fewer CIOs (19 percent) see their organizations as early adopters today, a step back from last year’s 22 percent.
* However, the proportion of CIOs that characterize themselves as part of an early majority with digital transformation rose from 45 percent last year to 49 percent this year, illustrating that, despite difficulties, IT leaders are moving ahead with digital transformation plans.

The main barriers to delivering digital transformation, CIOs say, include complexity, cost, culture, skills and security issues. Notably, 44 percent of CIOs cite the complexity of legacy technology as their top obstacle, while 50 percent point to cost, 56 percent name organizational culture as their largest issue, 34 percent say it’s a lack of skills, and 32 percent identify security as their biggest hurdle.

Far from discouraged, CIOs around the world have big plans for overcoming these digital transformation barriers:
*51 percent say they plan to replace and/or adapt existing infrastructure.
*51 percent plan to attempt culture change within their organizations.
*38 percent will address skills shortages through increased training and development.
*31 percent expect to invest in extra security capabilities.

“The way businesses view technology is undergoing an exciting yet fundamental shift,” says Vince DeLuca, CEO of Logicalis US. “The goal behind technology is no longer simply about implementing and managing tools that enable people to do their jobs. In a digitally transformed enterprise, it’s about giving people access to the information they need to fuel business agility and growth and to empower collaboration that will create business models no one has yet imagined. Digital transformation is the foundation upon which this new way of doing business will be built, and as this year’s Global CIO Survey indicates, IT leaders around the world not only recognize this, but they are determined to provide the platform their organizations need to embrace the change that is to come.”