NEW SOLUTION TO COMBAT THREATS TO PATIENT PRIVACY AND EHR TRUST

We talk with Protenus CEO, Robert Lord, about the danger of complacency in an easy-access interoperable world.
Like all things in life, there are good days, and bad; rainy days and silver linings. With healthcare, the drivers that we have been pushing as we motor down the cloud based highway have lead many to believe that patient record accessibility and interoperability is healthcare’s lone nirvana, its Holy Grail. In the same way that we all focus on paperless hospitals, we assume that, well, total access is a Good Thing.
And we would be wrong. Not that “interoperability” itself is a bad thing – but in a modern and real world, we need to be equally aware of the value of our patient data, and how vulnerable it is to both external and internal threats to patient data.
How so?
Because – if we consider that we would never make our Credit Card PIN available to anybody or that we would stand naked to probably only five people on the world; then our Doctor would certainly be one of them. Our personal patient medical record is private, and Hospitals have a duty of care to keep it so. This is not easy, and Hospitals need to take action.
Protenus is rising as one of the stars of HIMSS 2017. Protenus’ founders, Nick Culbertson and Robert Lord, met in medical school, but previously had careers in intelligence and finance , respectively. They now apply their backgrounds in these fields to the protection of electronic health records.
Robert Lord, CEO of Protenus, told us, when we caught up with him – that this is a matter of trust between you and your hospital. You need to feel secure that your personal data will remain personal to you and not be stolen or hacked. Interestingly, Robert told us that the biggest threat to our data comes from inside, the internal hacking of patient data.

Protenus has developed a platform that monitors access to patient data from employees, affiliates and business associates and ensures that every access is appropriate. Through using machine learning and rich clinical context, their system is highly accurate, and vastly improves the efficiency of privacy teams.
Robert is due to speak on this issue, alongside the CMIO of Johns Hopkins, Dr. Peter Greene, at HIMSS itself. What he said to us is: “We see a continuing transformation in the market – we believe that 2017 will be the year of insider threat awareness. While the challenges of inappropriate access and privacy violations have consistently plagued health systems, awareness of this issue has hit an important inflection point, with leaders throughout healthcare technology ready to change the way that we ensure trust in healthcare.”
The Protenus solution is enterprise software-as-a-service that can protect EHRs, HIEs, payors, and any other institution that stores and accesses patient data.

Telehealth is Tumbling 30-Day Readmissions Penalties

In time for this year’s HIMSS – Lee Horner, President of Stratus’s Telehealth Division, explains how Telehealth can  reduce re-admisisons.
High readmission rates are a $17 billion problem across the U.S. for hospital administrators.
What’s even more alarming is that a portion of 30-day readmissions are preventable. According to a recent University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, 27% of readmissions could be avoided. This study shows that hospitals must improve communications between patients, physicians, hospitals and primary care providers, while providing better post-discharge resources.
Upon discharge, if a patient is readmitted within 30 days, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requires payment from the hospital due to the guidelines of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) which penalizes preventable readmissions. However, the burden of keeping abreast of each patient’s unique recovery isn’t an easy task for both providers and hospitals.
Imagine that, as a patient, you are sent home from the hospital with a stack of discharge papers. Are you more likely to read every sheet carefully or to stack it in a corner, never to be looked at again?
Solutions to the readmissions problem are emerging in today’s market and are designed to support the management and monitoring of every patient’s unique recovery during their most critical time post-discharge from the hospital: the first 30 days. By offering a workflow that aligns with the patient’s recovery period, such solutions automate follow-up reminders, connecting patients and providers over a secure video call, and allows for patient Q&A.
Now, imagine the patient with the stack of post-discharge instructions. Instead, these emerging solutions have the ability to send a text or email at discharge with a link to join a video conference. The patient simply clicks the link and the automatic video call distribution will identify the next available provider for a telehealth follow-up via computer, tablet or smartphone. New telehealth developments can even send reminders to the patient until they participate in a follow-up call and through this continuous follow-up, ensuring reduced readmission rates which help both the patient and provider alike.
According to a 2016 Health Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) survey, connected health tools (mobile and wireless devices) are changing patient care delivery.

The survey also found:
67% of healthcare organizations utilized multiple connected health technology solutions
58% used mobile optimized patient portals as an important patient engagement tool in their connected health strategy
47% stated that they expect to add additional connected health technologies to their platform.
It is great news for patients and providers that telehealth and connected health tools, are growing and will continue to do so while supporting hospitals in meeting CMS guidelines and preventing 30-day readmissions.

Is There Too Much Data?

We look at the plethora of  Conferences in 2017, all focussing on the same Chief Data Officer market, and ask – why is life so complicated?
I don’t want to say we are not grateful. The specifically focussed “new generation” of Speakers and Vendors, all have something relevant to say. But this is the problem. Taken as a whole – there is just too much that people have to say.  It used to be just the one Conference, and the concept of the CDO was  twinkle in the eye. Now, we have the Chief Data Officer Europe 2017 Conference in London, from the 20th Feb, focussing on GDPR.  We have the Chief Data Officer Forum, from IQPC, in early May;  and then we have a Chief Data Scientist Conference, in September. I don’t know what a Chief data :Scientist”  is. All of which means that the whole area of expert opinion of a CDO, is diluted because from what we can see, there is no wrong opinion. What works for you, works for you.  But it might not work for someone else.
So where’s the value here?
The answer is in making it simple – and choosing the vendors, and venues, that intuitively make you feel at ease, and where the value is explained in something that mortals can understand. But “managing”  the process of your data is not just important for any corporate – it is vital and financially risky if you are not in control of the information which may reside anywhere in your ,multitude of databases.
Best up are the Adaptive Blogs, – you can register online at; http://www.adaptive.com. Their regular weekly Blog explains Metadata whilst giving you the options of digging deeper.
We talked a few days ago with Samantha Geenty at IQPC, who started the whole market in our view, just a couple of years ago; their “forum”  concept, which we have reviewed earlier on this Site – is a clever way of bringing people together at like levels of expertise and need.
And we are delighted to be reviewing the upcoming event in Covent Garden from Corinium, on the 22nd Feb.  As I said earlier, it’s not like I’m not grateful.

HIMSS after Obamacare

We look at the immediate US vendors who are keen to be visible in US healthcare in just a month or so. HIMSS orlando starts in just over one month.  expect to see a Litany of new Press announcements.
First up – Proximity Systems, Inc., the leading provider of innovative furniture solutions to healthcare will be at HIMSS 2017, Feb. 19 – 23, Booth # 4363, showcasing a new line of self-disinfecting cabinets designed to reduce the transmission of infection pathogens in healthcare environments.  With hospitals are under increasing pressure to reduce opportunities for nosocomial transmission from device workflow, the Proximity cabinets reduce bioburden on hospital surfaces around the clock, independent of human intervention.
Then we have;  Tyto Care, a telehealth company changing the healthcare technology landscape in 2017, and recently lauded as one of the top solutions coming out of CES. As the first complete telehealth solution enabling live, remote patient examinations of the ears, nose, throat, skin, heart and temperature, Tyto Care offers an experience comparable in quality and diagnostic potential to face-to-face visits— from the comfort of home.  Telehealth is transforming the US healthcare market, and we are keen to see how this will develop without the funding (if it goes that way) for US citizens generally.

How to sell in a Digital Market. Get back to basics.

We learn a timely lesson on how to make retail sales.

It’s so easy to forget, in this ecommerce world – that sales go to real people. When people go online and fish out their credit card – we are dealing with the same influences as if that person was sitting in front of us.  In fact less so – because they are not sitting in front of us.  And that process is more difficult because of that.
The eCommerce Show just a week or so ago in London – and this is similar to all of the others across Europe and USA – has increasingly forgotten that the “sales process”  is not about fulfilment, as important as this is. It is about the man relationship, or the semblance of this – during the virtual ordering process.
One of the key reasons why so many eCommerce companies bite the dust and do not have a long life expectancy, is their failure to get alongside their customers, face to face, and do this repeatedly, so that they both build up a relationship, but they also get a sale.
How do we know this?
We spent a day last Saturday signing copies of our own new Book, that was published by Austin Macauley and earlier launched at the London BookFair.  We travelled to a lovely market town in Wales, the shop owners gave customers small glasses of mulled  heated wine, and we did our magic engaging with customers. We sold ten times more books in one day than the average daily turnover.
The moral of this little story is;  get your “good customer sales process”  right – and you keep your customer for the long term.   Hide behind your digital process – and the customer will not come at all.

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